Value of Bitcoin "Crashes" - Slashdot

SlashDot: Bitcoin Currency Surpasses 20 National Currencies In Total Value

SlashDot: Bitcoin Currency Surpasses 20 National Currencies In Total Value submitted by playtin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin lost half value... so we earned 500% yearly! USD did what, -1% with inflation? (also please see comments and link to SLASHDOT discussion)

Bitcoin lost half value... so we earned 500% yearly! USD did what, -1% with inflation? (also please see comments and link to SLASHDOT discussion) submitted by rafalfreeman to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Value of Bitcoin Crashes 90% [Slashdot, Oct. 2011]

Value of Bitcoin Crashes 90% [Slashdot, Oct. 2011] submitted by runderwo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Value of Bitcoin "Crashes" - Slashdot

submitted by codemonkey2841 to whatstherumpus [link] [comments]

Namecoin and the future of self-sovereign digital identity.

Namecoin's motto is "Bitcoin frees money – Namecoin frees DNS, identities, and other technologies."
biolizard89 has done fantastic work on the DNS part, but let's focus on the identity use case here. Recent events have convinced me that digital identity on the internet is broken. Consider:
What was true in 1993 when cartoonist Peter Steiner wrote "On the internet, nobody knows you are a dog" is still true today. The only difference is that identity is increasingly being weaponized using AI/ML so "On the internet, nobody knows you are a bot" would perhaps be more apt.
I read the following comment from a user on slashdot yesterday:
For the time being, you can assume that this comment was written by a human being. You can click on my username, look back at my history of posts, and go, "OK, here's a bunch of posts, by a person, going back more than a decade, to the TIME BEFORE BOTS." That is, before the first year of 2020.
Since humans are likely to adopt the majority opinion, bad actors find real value in being able to control the narrative online by surrounding the reader with manufactured opinions by bots that due to advances in ML/AI are quickly becoming indistinguishable from real users. This amounts to a Sybil attack on the minds of digital content consumers and poses major threat to the integrity of our social fabric.
Apart from the recent twitter incident used for scamming, nation states have been known to create massive bot armies of fake and hijacked user accounts to try and shift the narratives regarding the Hong Kong independence protests as well as national elections. This will only increase.
Currently, our digital identity is fragmented into silo's largely controlled by government institutions and mega corporations (FAANG) based on a "Trust us" model. As recent events have proven, this is a bad model and in dire need of improvement/replacement. IMHO we need to move from "Trust us" to a "Trust but verify" model where the user is in full control of their digital identity.
Namecoin can and should play an important role in building this 'web of trust composed of self-sovereign identities" as it is neutral (no owner), permissionless and secure (merge-mined). Daniel already developed a proof of concept with NameID but what can we do to take this further?
Personally I'd like to see users create Namecoin identities and link them to their social identities (e.g. Google, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, etc). Then whenever they create content, they sign it with their private keys. This would allow a reader to verify the content was created by the user. Content verification would have stopped the recent twitter hack, because even if the hackers would have access to internal admin tools they would not have the private keys that the users produce valid content with. "Not your keys, not your content"
Content verification is only one part. Ideally a user would like to verify the integrity of the content creator as well. E.g. has this user passed human verification in any of the linked platforms? Does a trusted linked entity vouch for the reputation or integrity of this user (e.g. a government entity, financial entity or non-governmental organization?). This would require those platforms to allow linking of Namecoin ID with their Platform ID and allow lookup and signing of metadata provided by these platforms. (e.g. UserID Y is linked to PlatformID X and completed human verification on date Z, signed Twitter).
I image users could install an extension similar to uBlock or Privacy Badger that contains human curated blacklists and heuristics that operate on Namecoin entities to perform these checks and flag or filter content and users that fail integrity checks. This would allow a users to automatically weed out potential bots and trolls but keep full control of this process themselves, avoiding potential censorship if this task would fall on the platform owners themselves (something governments are pushing for).
We could take this even further and integrate Namecoin ID's in software and hardware devices as well. This could create chains of trust to verify the entire chain of content creation and manipulation to the final content posted on a social platform. Where every entity signs the resulting content. (E.g. camera -> photoshop -> twitter post)
Apart from signing content/messages (PGP style). Namecoin could perhaps also be used for managing identity tokens in a users 'Identity wallet'. Looking into my physical wallet this could include things like credit cards, insurance cards, government issued IDs, membership cards, transportation cards, key cards, etc. This could be done similar to 'colored coins' on Bitcoin. But would have to support some type of smart contract functionality to be useful (e.g. expiring tokens, etc).
I'm not a developer nor a technical writer, but I do think we need to think long and hard about how we can solve digital identity in a way that empowers users to trust and verify the content and identities of the peers we interact with online while also respecting privacy and preventing censorship by external parties. Namecoin could be the better path to building this web of trust, but given the current pace of AI/ML and the willingness by bad actors to weaponize it at scale against users interests we might not have much time. (Apologies for the rant!)
submitted by rmvaandr to Namecoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: btc top posts from 2019-01-06 to 2020-01-05 11:19 PDT

Period: 363.85 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 86748
Rate (per day) 2.75 237.19
Unique Redditors 317 7747
Combined Score 194633 356658

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 31014 points, 162 submissions: Egon_1
    1. Vitalik Buterin to Core Maxi: “ok bitcoiner” .... (515 points, 206 comments)
    2. These men are serving life without parole in max security prison for nonviolent drug offenses. They helped me through a difficult time in a very dark place. I hope 2019 was their last year locked away from their loved ones. FreeRoss.org/lifers/ Happy New Year. (502 points, 237 comments)
    3. "It’s official Burger King just accepted Bitcoin Cash and GoC token as a payment option in Slovenia." (423 points, 112 comments)
    4. "HOLY SATOSHI! 😱😱 I did it! A smart card that produces valid BitcoinCash signatures. Who would love to pay with a card—to a phone?? Tap took less than a second!👟..." (368 points, 105 comments)
    5. Chrome 'Has Become Surveillance Software. It's Time to Switch' -> Brave to support BCH! (330 points, 97 comments)
    6. Gavin Andresen (2017): "Running a network near 100% capacity is irresponsible engineering... " (316 points, 117 comments)
    7. "Evidently @github has banned all the Iranian users without an ability for them to download their repositories. A service like Github must be a public good and must not be controlled by a centralized entity. Another great example of why we as a society need to make web3 a reality" (314 points, 117 comments)
    8. Roger Ver: "Bitcoin Cash acceptance is coming to thousands of physical shops in Korea" (313 points, 120 comments)
    9. Paul Sztorc: “Will people really spend $70-$700 to open/modify a lightning channel when there's an Altcoin down the street which will process a (USD-denominated) payment for $0.05 ? Many people seem to think yes but honestly I just don't get it” (306 points, 225 comments)
    10. Food For Thought (303 points, 105 comments)
  2. 29021 points, 157 submissions: MemoryDealers
    1. Bitcoin Cash is Lightning Fast! (No editing needed) (436 points, 616 comments)
    2. Brains..... (423 points, 94 comments)
    3. Meanwhile in Hong Kong (409 points, 77 comments)
    4. Ross Ulbricht has served 6 years in federal prison. (382 points, 156 comments)
    5. Just another day at the Bitcoin Cash accepting super market in Slovenia. (369 points, 183 comments)
    6. Why I'm not a fan of the SV community: My recent bill for defending their frivolous lawsuit against open source software developers. (369 points, 207 comments)
    7. History Reminder: (354 points, 245 comments)
    8. It's more decentralized this way. (341 points, 177 comments)
    9. The new Bitcoin Cash wallet is so fast!!!!! (327 points, 197 comments)
    10. The IRS wants to subpoena Apple and Google to see if you have downloaded crypto currency apps. (324 points, 178 comments)
  3. 6909 points, 37 submissions: BitcoinXio
    1. Tim Pool on Twitter: “How the fuck are people justifying creating a world like the one's depicted in Fahrenheit 451 and 1984? You realize that censorship and banning information was a key aspect of the dystopian nightmare right?” (435 points, 75 comments)
    2. The creator of the now famous HODL meme says that the HODL term has been corrupted and doesn’t mean what he intended; also mentions that the purpose of Bitcoin is to spend it and that BTC has lost its value proposition. (394 points, 172 comments)
    3. Erik Voorhees on Twitter: “I wonder if you realize that if Bitcoin didn’t work well as a payment system in the early days it likely would not have taken off. Many (most?) people found the concept of instant borderless payments captivating and inspiring. “Just hold this stuff” not sufficient.” (302 points, 66 comments)
    4. Bitfinex caught paying a company to astroturf on social media including Reddit, Twitter, Medium and other platforms (285 points, 86 comments)
    5. WARNING: If you try to use the Lightning Network you are at extremely HIGH RISK of losing funds and is not recommended or safe to do at this time or for the foreseeable future (274 points, 168 comments)
    6. Craig Wright seems to have rage quit Twitter (252 points, 172 comments)
    7. No surprise here: Samson Mow among other BTC maxi trolls harassed people to the point of breakdown (with rape threats, etc) (249 points, 85 comments)
    8. On Twitter: “PSA: The Lightning Network is being heavily data mined right now. Opening channels allows anyone to cluster your wallet and associate your keys with your IP address.” (228 points, 102 comments)
    9. btc is being targeted and attacked, yet again (220 points, 172 comments)
    10. Brian Armstrong CEO of Coinbase using Bitcoin Cash (BCH) to pay for food, video in tweet (219 points, 66 comments)
  4. 6023 points, 34 submissions: money78
    1. BSV in a nutshell... (274 points, 60 comments)
    2. There is something going on with @Bitcoin twitter account: 1/ The URL of the white paper has been changed from bitcoin.com into bitcoin.org! 2/ @Bitcoin has unfollowed all other BCH related accounts. 3/ Most of the posts that refer to "bitcoin cash" have been deleted?!! Is it hacked again?! (269 points, 312 comments)
    3. "Not a huge @rogerkver fan and never really used $BCH. But he wiped up the floor with @ToneVays in Malta, and even if you happen to despise BCH, it’s foolish and shortsighted not to take these criticisms seriously. $BTC is very expensive and very slow." (262 points, 130 comments)
    4. Jonathan Toomim: "At 32 MB, we can handle something like 30% of Venezuela's population using BCH 2x per day. Even if that's all BCH ever achieved, I'd call that a resounding success; that's 9 million people raised out of poverty. Not a bad accomplishment for a hundred thousand internet geeks." (253 points, 170 comments)
    5. Jonathan Toomim: "BCH will not allow block sizes that are large enough to wreak havoc. We do our capacity engineering before lifting the capacity limits. BCH's limit is 32 MB, which the network can handle. BSV does not share this approach, and raises limits before improving actual capacity." (253 points, 255 comments)
    6. What Bitcoin Cash has accomplished so far 💪 (247 points, 55 comments)
    7. Which one is false advertising and misleading people?! Bitcoin.com or Bitcoin.org (232 points, 90 comments)
    8. A message from Lightning Labs: "Don't put more money on lightning than you're willing to lose!" (216 points, 118 comments)
    9. Silk Road’s Ross Ulbricht thanks Bitcoin Cash’s [BCH] Roger Ver for campaigning for his release (211 points, 29 comments)
    10. This account just donated more than $6600 worth of BCH via @tipprbot to multiple organizations! (205 points, 62 comments)
  5. 4514 points, 22 submissions: unstoppable-cash
    1. Reminder: bitcoin mods removed top post: "The rich don't need Bitcoin. The poor do" (436 points, 89 comments)
    2. Peter R. Rizun: "LN User walks into a bank, says "I need a loan..." (371 points, 152 comments)
    3. It was SO simple... Satoshi had the answer to prevent full-blocks back in 2010! (307 points, 150 comments)
    4. REMINDER: "Bitcoin isn't for people that live on less than $2/day" -Samson Mow, CSO of BlockStream (267 points, 98 comments)
    5. "F'g insane... waited 5 hrs and still not 1 confirmation. How does anyone use BTC over BCH BitcoinCash?" (258 points, 222 comments)
    6. Irony:"Ave person won't be running LN routing node" But CORE/BTC said big-blocks bad since everyone can't run their own node (256 points, 161 comments)
    7. BitPay: "The Wikimedia Foundation had been accepting Bitcoin for several years but recently switched pmt processors to BitPay so they can now accept Bitcoin Cash" (249 points, 61 comments)
    8. FreeTrader: "Decentralization is dependent on widespread usage..." (195 points, 57 comments)
    9. The FLIPPENING: Fiat->OPEN Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash! Naomi Brockwell earning more via BitBacker than Patreon! (193 points, 12 comments)
    10. LN Commentary from a guy that knows a thing or 2 about Bitcoin (Gavin Andresen-LEAD developer after Satoshi left in 2010) (182 points, 80 comments)
  6. 3075 points, 13 submissions: BeijingBitcoins
    1. Last night's BCH & BTC meetups in Tokyo were both at the same restaurant (Two Dogs). We joined forces for this group photo! (410 points, 166 comments)
    2. Chess.com used to accept Bitcoin payments but, like many other businesses, disabled the option. After some DMs with an admin there, I'm pleased to announce that they now accept Bitcoin Cash! (354 points, 62 comments)
    3. WSJ: Bitfinex Used Tether Reserves to Mask Missing $850 Million, Probe Finds (348 points, 191 comments)
    4. Bitcoiners: Then and Now [MEME CONTEST - details in comments] (323 points, 72 comments)
    5. I'd post this to /Bitcoin but they would just remove it right away (also I'm banned) (320 points, 124 comments)
    6. So this is happening at the big protest in Hong Kong right now (270 points, 45 comments)
    7. /Bitcoin mods are censoring posts that explain why BitPay has to charge an additional fee when accepting BTC payments (219 points, 110 comments)
    8. The guy who won this week's MillionaireMakers drawing has received ~$55 in BCH and ~$30 in BTC. It will cost him less than $0.01 to move the BCH, but $6.16 (20%) in fees to move the BTC. (164 points, 100 comments)
    9. The Bitcoin whitepaper was published 11 years ago today. Check out this comic version of the whitepaper, one of the best "ELI5" explanations out there. (153 points, 12 comments)
    10. Two Years™ is the new 18 Months™ (142 points, 113 comments)
  7. 2899 points, 18 submissions: jessquit
    1. Oh, the horror! (271 points, 99 comments)
    2. A few days ago I caught flak for reposting a set of graphs that didn't have their x-axes correctly labeled or scaled. tvand13 made an updated graph with correct labeling and scaling. I am reposting it as I promised. I invite the viewer to draw their own conclusions. (214 points, 195 comments)
    3. Do you think Bitcoin needs to increase the block size? You're in luck! It already did: Bitcoin BCH. Avoid the upcoming controversial BTC block size debate by trading your broken Bitcoin BTC for upgraded Bitcoin BCH now. (209 points, 194 comments)
    4. Master list of evidence regarding Bitcoin's hijacking and takeover by Blockstream (185 points, 113 comments)
    5. PSA: BTC not working so great? Bitcoin upgraded in 2017. The upgraded Bitcoin is called BCH. There's still time to upgrade! (185 points, 192 comments)
    6. Nobody uses Bitcoin Cash (182 points, 88 comments)
    7. Double-spend proofs, SPV fraud proofs, and Cashfusion improvements all on the same day! 🏅 BCH PLS! 🏅 (165 points, 36 comments)
    8. [repost] a reminder on how btc and Bitcoin Cash came to be (150 points, 102 comments)
    9. Holy shit the entire "negative with gold" sub has become a shrine devoted to the guilded astroturfing going on in rbtc (144 points, 194 comments)
    10. This sub is the only sub in all of Reddit that allows truly uncensored discussion of BTC. If it turns out that most of that uncensored discussion is negative, DON'T BLAME US. (143 points, 205 comments)
  8. 2839 points, 13 submissions: SwedishSalsa
    1. With Bitcoin, for the first time in modern history, we have a way to opt out. (356 points, 100 comments)
    2. In this age of rampant censorship and control, this is why I love Bitcoin. (347 points, 126 comments)
    3. The crypto expert (303 points, 29 comments)
    4. Satoshi reply to Mike Hearn, April 2009. Everybody, especially newcomers and r-bitcoin-readers should take a step back and read this. (284 points, 219 comments)
    5. Bitcoin Cash looking good lately. (235 points, 33 comments)
    6. Roger Ver bad (230 points, 61 comments)
    7. History of the BTC scaling debate (186 points, 54 comments)
    8. MFW i read Luke Jr wants to limit BTC blocks to 300k. (183 points, 116 comments)
    9. Meanwhile over at bitcoinsv... (163 points, 139 comments)
    10. Listen people... (155 points, 16 comments)
  9. 2204 points, 10 submissions: increaseblocks
    1. China bans Bitcoin again, and again, and again (426 points, 56 comments)
    2. China bans Bitcoin (again) (292 points, 35 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Cash Network has now been upgraded! (238 points, 67 comments)
    4. So you want small blocks with high fees to validate your own on chain transactions that happen OFF CHAIN? (212 points, 112 comments)
    5. It’s happening - BTC dev Luke jr writing code to Bitcoin BTC codebase to fork to lower the block size to 300kb! (204 points, 127 comments)
    6. Former BTC maximalist admits that maxi's lied cheated and stealed to get SegWit and Lightning (201 points, 135 comments)
    7. Just 18 more months to go! (172 points, 86 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Cash ring - F*CK BANKS (167 points, 51 comments)
    9. LTC Foundation chat leaked: no evidence of development, lack of transparency (155 points, 83 comments)
    10. A single person controls nearly half of all the Lightning Network’s capacity (137 points, 109 comments)
  10. 2138 points, 12 submissions: JonyRotten
    1. 'Craig Is a Liar' – Early Adopter Proves Ownership of Bitcoin Address Claimed by Craig Wright (309 points, 165 comments)
    2. 200,000 People Have Signed Ross Ulbricht's Clemency Petition (236 points, 102 comments)
    3. Street Artist Hides $1,000 in BTC Inside a Mural Depicting Paris Protests (236 points, 56 comments)
    4. Craig Wright Ordered to Produce a List of Early Bitcoin Addresses in Kleiman Lawsuit (189 points, 66 comments)
    5. Ross Ulbricht Clemency Petition Gathers 250,000 Signatures (163 points, 24 comments)
    6. Ross Ulbricht Letter Questions the Wisdom of Imprisoning Non-Violent Offenders (160 points, 50 comments)
    7. Expert Witness in Satoshi Case Claims Dr Wright's Documents Were Doctored (155 points, 44 comments)
    8. California City Official Uses Bitcoin Cash to Purchase Cannabis (151 points, 36 comments)
    9. Money Transmitter License Not Required for Crypto Businesses in Pennsylvania (141 points, 9 comments)
    10. McAfee to Launch Decentralized Token Exchange With No Restrictions (137 points, 35 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. jessquit (16708 points, 2083 comments)
  2. Ant-n (7878 points, 1517 comments)
  3. MemoryDealers (7366 points, 360 comments)
  4. Egon_1 (6205 points, 1001 comments)
  5. 500239 (5745 points, 735 comments)
  6. BitcoinXio (4640 points, 311 comments)
  7. LovelyDay (4353 points, 457 comments)
  8. chainxor (4293 points, 505 comments)
  9. MobTwo (3420 points, 174 comments)
  10. ShadowOfHarbringer (3388 points, 478 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. The perfect crypto t-shirt by Korben (742 points, 68 comments)
  2. The future of Libra Coin by themadscientistt (722 points, 87 comments)
  3. when you become a crypto trader... by forberniesnow (675 points, 54 comments)
  4. A Reminder Why You Shouldn’t Use Google. by InMyDayTVwasBooks (637 points, 209 comments)
  5. Imagine if in 2000 Apple just sat around all day shit-talking Microsoft. Apple would have never gone anywhere. Apple succeeded because they learned from their mistakes, improved, and got better. BCH should do the same. by guyfawkesfp (552 points, 255 comments)
  6. Bitcoin made The Simpsons intro! Sorry for the potato quality by Johans_wilgat (521 points, 44 comments)
  7. Vitalik Buterin to Core Maxi: “ok bitcoiner” .... by Egon_1 (515 points, 206 comments)
  8. Can't stop won't stop by Greentoboggan (514 points, 78 comments)
  9. These men are serving life without parole in max security prison for nonviolent drug offenses. They helped me through a difficult time in a very dark place. I hope 2019 was their last year locked away from their loved ones. FreeRoss.org/lifers/ Happy New Year. by Egon_1 (502 points, 237 comments)
  10. Blockchain? by unesgt (479 points, 103 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 211 points: fireduck's comment in John Mcafee on the run from IRS Tax Evasion charges, running 2020 Presidential Campaign from Venezuela in Exile
  2. 203 points: WalterRothbard's comment in I am a Bitcoin supporter and developer, and I'm starting to think that Bitcoin Cash could be better, but I have some concerns, is anyone willing to discuss them?
  3. 179 points: Chris_Pacia's comment in The BSV chain has just experienced a 6-block reorg
  4. 163 points: YourBodyIsBCHn's comment in I made this account specifically to tip in nsfw/gonewild subreddits
  5. 161 points: BeijingBitcoins's comment in Last night's BCH & BTC meetups in Tokyo were both at the same restaurant (Two Dogs). We joined forces for this group photo!
  6. 156 points: hawks5999's comment in You can’t make this stuff up. This is how BTC supporters actually think. From bitcoin: “What you can do to make BTC better: check twice if you really need to use it!” 🤦🏻‍♂️
  7. 155 points: lowstrife's comment in Steve Wozniak Sold His Bitcoin at Its Peak $20,000 Valuation
  8. 151 points: kdawgud's comment in The government is taking away basic freedoms we each deserve
  9. 147 points: m4ktub1st's comment in BCH suffered a 51% attack by colluding miners to re-org the chain in order to reverse transactions - why is nobody talking about this? Dangerous precident
  10. 147 points: todu's comment in Why I'm not a fan of the SV community: My recent bill for defending their frivolous lawsuit against open source software developers.
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Playing devil's advocate- "Why Bitcoin will crash to $0", by a Bitcoin supporter.

OK, let me start by saying that I think the general idea of a cryptographic currency is a brilliant one. I can definitely see Bitcoin establishing itself as a major world currency, and basically doing to fiat currencies what email did to the postal system.
However, whenever I mention Bitcoin to anyone, I strongly encourage them not to invest more than they are prepared to lose. I myself only own 10 BTC. Why? Because Bitcoin has flaws, and it has potential enemies, and I think there's a very good chance that the currency could be basically destroyed overnight.
THE PROBLEMS:
  1. The code. Bitcoin is not a magic black box. It's a complicated piece of open-source software, written by a community of volunteers and hobbyists with various degrees of ability. IT CONTAINS BUGS. What these bugs are and how serious their symptoms will be remains to be seen, but we have already had a few serious problems (such as the 0.7/0.8 fork) and it's likely there will be more to come.
  2. The value of exploits. With the soaring value of Bitcoins, it is likely that it will increasingly become a target for attack. If someone can find and exploit a flaw, they can make a fortune. Due to the nature of Bitcoin, it would be almost impossible to discover the culprit or recover any losses. This was already happening when there was almost nothing to gain from it!
  3. Government intervention. Currency manipulation is one of the core economic controls of government. Mass adoption of Bitcoin would render this tool ineffective, or even unusable. It's certainly conceivable that the US or EU could implement a blanket ban on Bitcoin trades, which would utterly cripple the currency's expansion. As we're now hitting the point where large-scale funds are buying into Bitcoin, such a move would cause a rapid exodus of significant funds, by a few small high-worth individuals over a very short timescale. This, combined with the effect of legislation, would almost inevitably trigger a large-scale panic sell-off, and there would be no market remaining to allow for the currency's revival.
  4. Corporate sabotage. Moneygram, Western Union, Paypal. Just three examples of multi-billion dollar multinationals with business models which would be rendered obsolete should Bitcoin achieve widespread adoption. Bitcoin, despite its rapid expansion and long-term potential, is tiny compared to many large organisations which have a vested interest in seeing the currency fail. At its current size, the Bitcoin economy could be toppled for a handful of million dollars- enough to buy and sell large volumes specifically to cause huge price swings, to undermine confidence with smear campaigns, or to directly attack flaws in the software or the network that underpins it.
  5. Fundamental flaws. The design of Bitcoin is not perfect. We're already seeing the blockchain becoming bloated by the micro-transactions of SatoshiDice. What if the volume of these were to rise a thousandfold, through deliberate flooding or simply through the natural expansion of the currency? We're already worried about mining guilds which have control of too much computing power. 51% is quoted as the minimum level required in order to subvert the Bitcoin transaction system successfully. This is not strictly true- 51% is simply the point at which an attack becomes more likely to succeed than to fail. It's perfectly possible that an entity with a significant non-majority of mining power could succeed in poisoning the blockchain with dishonest blocks. This can be attempted over and over again by a motivated group or individual, and it only needs to succeed once to cause irreparable damage to Bitcoin's credibility.
With the current public interest in the currency, the media spotlight focused on it, and the fledgling involvement of high-value investors likely to abandon Bitcoin forcefully if they foresee any potential losses, I believe that Bitcoin is extremely vulnerable at present. Any one of the problems listed could trigger a panic which would crash the currency overnight, and in a way that it wouldn't likely recover from.
So, whilst I'm not concerned about the effects of speculative bubbles, and I do believe Bitcoin is destined for long-term success, I urge caution. Please, don't invest more than you can afford to lose.
submitted by rcpinchey to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Hiring] Online marketing, working from home, long term (this is for the second position). You don't actually have to know any marketing - I train you remotely.

EDIT: 3 days later, 30 private messages but not even one valid application. Read the "How to apply" part!
EDIT #2: The second position has been filled as well. Looking to fill a third position now (yes, still looking December 2017), and no need to be active on HN for this one therefore I'm updating the body below.
 
Requirements:
Salary:
Schedule:
  • 4 hours per day, 14:00 – 18:00 UTC, Monday to Friday. You can choose to work weekends as well when you want to, and you notice that you could be helpful for a certain day.
Other advantages:
  • The job is very secure. Being an efficient marketing company that actually offers value to customers, it's practically impossible to go bankrupt. We walk the walk, in a field pestered with scams.
  • If you have your own marketing capabilities that would actually be helpful to our clients, there's opportunity to earn more money by providing your own services through our platform. Since most of our clients are ICOs and cryptocurrencies, being able to understand a white paper and assess the quality of a repository would definitely open up more possibilities inside the company.
  • Being knowledgeable about cryptocurrencies and native in any of these languages would also open up possibilities for contractor work inside the company (meaning that you'll get a percentage of the contract with a specific client): Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, Mandarin, Hindi, Arabic, South Korean or Japanese.
  • I am open to salary renegotiation from time to time, as the company becomes more established and future-proof. Actually, I'll probably even be the one to bring it up. My objective is for everybody to feel good and make enough money. I want to make people happy. I don't want to get rich on the back of others.
  • The training period will be paid (it should take around 2-3 days). Before it you'll be asked to read certain resources. Your time doing the reading won't be paid.
  • A lot of independence. You won't have a supervisor. You will be counted on to self-improve and self-administer your work. When new customer orders arrive through email, you're expected to process the ones that fall under your responsibility.
  • I'll say it again: working from your own cozy home. No time lost in traffic.
How to apply:
  • Send a private message specifying that you're interested, and also rate how fitting are the schedule and salary for you. Please also include your main Reddit username/s. Checking their history will help me assess your English level. If you're active on any of these networks, please send those usernames as well: Hacker News, Quora, GrowthHackers, Inbound, Twitter, BitcoinTalk, Steemit, Lobsters and Slashdot.
 
submitted by five-leaf_clover to Jobs4Bitcoins [link] [comments]

[Hiring] (Online) marketing, 3rd position, working from home, long term. You don't actually have to know any marketing - I train you remotely.

Read the "How to apply" part! Apply exactly through that method!
This is for a third position because the first two have been filled already with the help of this subreddit.
EDIT: A forth position is now available. The third has been filled. I will remove this EDIT when the 4th position is filled.
 
Requirements:
Salary:
Schedule:
  • 4 hours per day, 14:00 – 18:00 UTC, Monday to Friday. You can choose to work weekends as well when you want to, and you notice that you could be helpful for a certain day.
Other advantages:
  • The job is very secure. Being an efficient marketing company that actually offers value to customers, it's practically impossible to go bankrupt. We walk the walk, in a field pestered with scams.
  • If you have your own marketing capabilities that would actually be helpful to our clients, there's opportunity to earn more money by providing your own services through our platform. Since most of our clients are ICOs and cryptocurrencies, being able to understand a white paper and assess the quality of a repository would definitely open up more possibilities inside the company.
  • Being knowledgeable about cryptocurrencies and native in any of these languages would also open up possibilities for contractor work inside the company (meaning that you'll get a percentage of the contract with a specific client): Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, Mandarin, Hindi, Arabic, Korean, Japanese, Russian, German, French, Italian.
  • I am open to salary renegotiation from time to time, as the company becomes more established and future-proof. Actually, I'll probably even be the one to bring it up. My objective is for everybody to feel good and make enough money. I want to make people happy. I don't want to get rich on the back of others.
  • The training period will be paid (it should take around 2-3 days). Before it you'll be asked to read certain resources. Your time doing the reading won't be paid.
  • A lot of independence. You won't have a supervisor. You will be counted on to self-improve and self-administer your work. When new customer orders arrive through email, you're expected to process the ones that fall under your responsibility.
  • I'll say it again: working from your own cozy home. No time lost in traffic.
How to apply:
  • Send a private message specifying that you're interested, and also rate how fitting are the schedule and salary for you. Please also include your main Reddit username/s. Checking their history will help me assess your English level. If you're active on any of these networks, please send those usernames as well: Hacker News, Quora, GrowthHackers, Inbound, Twitter, BitcoinTalk, Steemit, Lobsters and Slashdot.
 
submitted by five-leaf_clover to Jobs4Bitcoins [link] [comments]

A history of Bitcoin – told through the five different groups who bought it

A history of Bitcoin – told through the five different groups who bought it
www.fmz.com
The recent fluctuations in Bitcoin’s value are just the latest in a series of spectacular peaks and troughs since it was created in 2009. (Though its price has been falling recently, it remains five times higher than last April, before the latest major peak began.)
Commentators are often dismissive of Bitcoin buyers, writing them off as naive victims of a fraudulent bubble. But if we look more carefully, we can trace the history of Bitcoin through five key narratives. Each has drawn in a different group of buyers and in doing so contributed to its long-term growth in value.
The idealists
Bitcoin arose from a tiny group of cryptographers who were trying to solve the “double spend” problem facing digital money: “cash” held as a digital file could easily be copied and then used multiple times. The problem is easily solved by financial institutions, who use a secure central ledger to record how much everyone has in their accounts, but the cryptographers wanted a solution that was more akin to physical cash: private, untraceable, and independent of third parties like the banks.
Satoshi Nakamoto’s solution was the Bitcoin blockchain, a cryptographically secured public ledger that records transactions anonymously and is kept as multiple copies on many different users’ computers. The first narrative of Bitcoin’s value was built into Nakamoto’s original “white paper”. This claimed that Bitcoin would be superior to existing forms of electronic money such as credit cards, providing benefits like eliminating chargebacks to merchants and reducing transaction fees.
The libertarians
www.fmz.com
FMZ
But from an early stage, Nakamoto also marketed Bitcoin to a libertarian audience. He did so by stressing the absence of any central authority and particularly Bitcoin’s independence from both states and existing financial institutions.
Nakamoto criticised central banks for debasing money by issuing increasing amounts of it and designed Bitcoin to have a hard limit on the amount that could be issued. And he stressed the anonymity of Bitcoin transactions: safe, more or less, from the prying eyes of the state. Libertarians became enthusiastic advocates and buyers of Bitcoin, more as an act of rebellion than for financial reasons. They have remained highly influential in the Bitcoin community.
The savvy young
These, however, were small constituencies, and Bitcoin really started to take off in July 2010 when a short article on Slashdot: News for nerds, stuff that matters(“news for nerds”) spread the word to many young and technically savvy buyers. This community was influenced by the “Californian ideology” – belief in the capacity of technology and entrepreneurs to transform the world.
Many bought small quantities at a low price and were somewhat bemused to find themselves sitting on significant investments when the price multiplied. They became used to huge fluctuations in the price and frequently advocated “hodling” Bitcoin (a mis-spelling of “hold”, first used in a now iconic message posted by an inebriated user determined to resist constant “sell” messages from day traders). The hodlers insisted, half seriously, that Bitcoin was going “to the moon!” (used 178,000 times on the bitcointalk forums), and talked of buying “lambos” (lamborghinis) with their gains. This countercultural levity generated a sense of community and a commitment to holding Bitcoin that helps to sustain its value.
The investors
FMZ
The last two groups that have contributed to Bitcoin’s history are more conventional. What I consider the fourth group of investors consists of speculators who have been attracted by the volatility and peaks in Bitcoin prices.
On the one hand, we have the day traders, who hope to exploit the volatility of Bitcoin’s price by buying and selling quickly to take advantage of short-term price movements. Like speculators in any other asset, they have no real interest in the larger picture or of questions of inherent value, but only in the price today. Their only narratives are “buy” and “sell”, often employed in an attempt to influence the market.
On the other hand, we have those who are drawn in by news of price bubbles. Ironically, bubble narratives in the press, often designed to deter investors, can have the opposite effect. These investors join what Keynes called a “beauty contest” – they only care what other people might be prepared to pay for a Bitcoin in the short to medium term future.
www.fmz.com
The portfolio balancers
The final and newest group of Bitcoin buyers are the portfolio balancers: more sophisticated investors who buy Bitcoin to hedge against wider risks in the financial system. According to modern portfolio theory, investors can reduce the riskiness of their portfolios overall by buying some Bitcoin because its peaks and troughs don’t line up with those of other assets, providing some insurance against stock market crashes. This is an emerging group, but one that could significantly raise Bitcoin’s acceptability among mainstream investors.
Bitcoin’s value, then, has been built on an evolving series of narratives which have drawn in successive waves of buyers. While mainstream commentators are often dismissive of Bitcoin as lacking inherent value, all asset market values depend on narrative processes like these.
Bitcoin may well collapse again, but so may any other financial asset. Investing in Bitcoin is neither more nor less risky than investing in the latest technology company launched on the stock market without ever having made a profit.
FMZ
submitted by Ruby-Yao to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

My bitcoin value has surpassed my decade long stock account

Throwaway account because I'm revealing more than I want tied to my primary account.
I'll put the TL;DR at the top.
TL;DR: Apparently, I'm well off and 2 years of bitcoins are worth more than 10 years of stock market investment.
I'm nearly 50 years old. A few years out of college and I just barely broke $20k salary. That was worth more than $20k today, but was still a lousy wage with college loan debt. I briefly (1.5 years) had a dotcom job at the turn of the millineum making more than I do now, but I had never had money like that before and boosted the economy instead of putting any aside. I did get some nice toys, though.
Add on another 1.5 years of unemployment, living off my wife's meager salary and a few odd under-the-table jobs, and I finally landed a decent paying job again. Nothing like the dotcom days, but close. However, I'd learned we could live on much less and I wanted a cushion. I dumped tons into my 401k, my savings account and opened a Scottrade account. A little money goes each month to savings and Scottrade.
Roughly ten years later, my 401k is about 3 times my annual income. The Scottrade account is about 30% of it.
Two years ago, I heard about bitcoin on Slashdot. It sounded interesting. I started mining on my son's gaming machine, which meant it was only mining when my son wasn't playing games and if he remembered to start the miner when he was done.
I mined solo for a few days, and quickly joined a mining pool. I was getting a bitcoin every three or four days initially. That didn't last long.
I opened a MtGox account, added some cash and purchased btc almost at the height of the 2011 spike.
I felt like an idiot.
I bought some Casascius coins. I left my MtGox account alone.
This was also around the time the 99% protests were going on. I felt very sympathetic. I remember in reading about the protests, I stumbled across a site that showed what percentage people were based on annual income. With mine and my wife's income, I was above the 90th percentile and below the 95th. I remember the horror and disbelief I felt.
Througout it all, I continued mining. I got lucky during the early 2013 spike and sold some of the MtGox stuff I'd had sitting there. I also got a high end SLR camera at bitcoinstore.com almost at the peak. I was feeling pretty good.
I bought a ButterflyLabs Jalapeno with bitcoins just before that first 2013 spike. I also stopped even trying to mine with a graphics card soon after that because it made no sense. I did eventually get delivery of the Jalapeno. It's earned almost .68 bitcoins. Don't ask what it cost in bitcoins, because I don't remember and I don't want to know.
After realizing my MtGox profits couldn't be pulled out in dollars in any reasonable timeframe, I converted them to bitcoins and pulled them out. I got more bitcoins than I sold them for, but not by much.
So, now I own bitcoins in the high 2 digits, about a third of them are still in physical Casascius coins. I only have an account on MtGox, so I have no real way of converting any of them to cash. I still have $100 sitting in the MtGox account, which I should have converted into bitcoins and pulled out long ago, but I'm frustrated by the premium bitcoins require in USD on MtGox.
For nearly ten years, I've been putting money in my Scottrade account. I saw the collapse in 2008 and mostly held. I bought bank stocks at that time and made a killing. That killing was offset by the REITs I'd invested in before the crash.
In ten years of regular transfers to Scottrade and investment that has gotten better as I've gotten older and more cynical, I've accumulate about 30% of my annual income.
In the last few days, even with the purchase of a cool SLR and the cut involved in Casascius coin purchases, my double-digit bitcoin ownership has now surpassed my Scottrade account in value. I don't have an easy way of converting that bitcoin to USD, but I'm also not concerned about that because I think that easy methods will exist soon.
I fully expect that my bitcoins will be worth less in the near future. However, I believe in the long term, they'll be worth more and that I'll have a number of easier possibilities for converting them to USD if I want to.
I also believe the analogies to the early WWW are flawed. I think analogies to the IP protocol are more apt and that we've only begun to imagine the possibilities.
I'm in it for the long haul. They'll either be worth nothing or much more than now. And, if I add up my electricity costs and the small investment I made during the spike in 2011, I'm still ahead of the game because I have an SLR camera that my wife would never have let me buy with cash.
I'm already ahead of the game and I think the game hasn't even started.
EDIT: Grammar
submitted by throaway419 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

This will all end in tears.

Ideas are not harmless. Ideas can be destructive, regardless of whether they are right or wrong. New ideas run at risk of disturbing the homeostasis that evolved in the environment they contaminate.
I worry everyday about what we have created. Inventions can not be put back into the box they came from. As soon as we announce a new invention, we lose control over it. Worse, there is no guarantee that a new invention ends up benefiting humanity in the long run.
With the discovery of nuclear weapons we ensured that another great war would be the last one. With the discovery of heroin we ensured the death through addiction of millions. With Bitcoin, we have changed the natural laws that governed the global economy. This will inevitably trigger the largest social upheaval in modern history.
Governments know that technology is the most disruptive power in the world. The American government knew this was going to happen. The NSA came up with a theoretical implementation of Bitcoin in 1996. They knew. And they prepared themselves.
Today the US government is the owner of 144.336 Bitcoin, or one percent of the total current supply. Don't expect your government to let go of those coins. If the US government would ever see a need to purchase Bitcoin, it's own acquisition of new Bitcoin would inevitably trigger a rise in prices. This was the easiest way for your government to step into the game and preserve its own relevancy in the coming global economy.
The official narrative is that Bitcoin surged as a result of the stability found through the closure of Silk Road. The Chinese then stepped into the market and we ended up at 200 dollar a coin. The official narrative is a lie.
The sudden massive increase in volume on Chinese Bitcoin exchanges was completely unexplainable. There was no rise in client downloads in China. There was no rise in Bitcoin search volume on Baidu. There was no rise in Bitcoin visits on the Chinese Wikipedia. There was no Chinese bubble. You can all look this up for yourself, and you'll see that I'm right.
What happened is that the world's second largest superpower took an emergency response upon discovering that the world's largest superpower seized 1% of the global Bitcoin supply. The closure of Silk Road was never about drugs, it was about seizing Bitcoin without causing a price spike.
Who was capable of causing the April 2013 DDOS attacks that brought Mt Gox to its knees, triggering a price collapse? The US government owns a massive botnet.
The US government thinks about the long term. Their goal is to make the worldwide adaptation of Bitcoin as little disruptive as possible. They know what's going to happen and the chaos it will cause. We're only barely beginning to understand what we have unleashed.
As mentioned earlier, you have no power to stop the use of a technology. Mr. Nobel was horrified to see how dynamite was used, you will be horrified to see how Bitcoin will be used. You can't decide how Bitcoin will be used any more than Bram Cohen could decide what you will and won't get to download with Bittorrent. There is no "Stop" sign that Bitcoin has to obey. There is 32 trillion dollar worth of wealth hidden off shore to avoid paying taxes. This is sooner or later going to end up stored in Bitcoin.
People who own Bitcoin will see no need to pay taxes, thus leading to a rise in taxes for people who do pay taxes, thus leading to more people fleeing to Bitcoin. Eventually, this leads to a situation where all financial transactions are done in Bitcoin. Fiat currency is going to be worthless.
This is good news for you, but not for the rest of humanity. We are about to witness the largest transfer of wealth in human history. The victims will be those a few years from now who didn't invest and are forced to buy Bitcoin to pay for their groceries when the value of the dollar starts to take a nosedive.
How will your neighbor feel when his savings have become worthless and his bank won't let him withdraw the money? How will people in third world countries without access to Bitcoin feel? How will the people of the world feel about people becoming billionaires through sheer luck? Will those people use their power in a responsible manner?
You're going to feel thankful for every crash we've had, as every crash encouraged people with a large balance to divest and thereby lead to a more egalitarian distribution of Bitcoin. The problem is nonetheless unavoidable. There will be anonymous Bitcoin billionaires. There will be social and economic chaos.
I genuinely hope that I'm wrong and shake my head a few years from now. We can't count on such luck however. Think about what you're going to do. You successfully inverted the global economic order. Now you are at the steering wheel.
submitted by accountt1234 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A history of Bitcoin – told through the five different groups who bought it

A history of Bitcoin – told through the five different groups who bought it
www.fmz.com
The recent fluctuations in Bitcoin’s value are just the latest in a series of spectacular peaks and troughs since it was created in 2009. (Though its price has been falling recently, it remains five times higher than last April, before the latest major peak began.)
Commentators are often dismissive of Bitcoin buyers, writing them off as naive victims of a fraudulent bubble. But if we look more carefully, we can trace the history of Bitcoin through five key narratives. Each has drawn in a different group of buyers and in doing so contributed to its long-term growth in value.
The idealists
Bitcoin arose from a tiny group of cryptographers who were trying to solve the “double spend” problem facing digital money: “cash” held as a digital file could easily be copied and then used multiple times. The problem is easily solved by financial institutions, who use a secure central ledger to record how much everyone has in their accounts, but the cryptographers wanted a solution that was more akin to physical cash: private, untraceable, and independent of third parties like the banks.
Satoshi Nakamoto’s solution was the Bitcoin blockchain, a cryptographically secured public ledger that records transactions anonymously and is kept as multiple copies on many different users’ computers. The first narrative of Bitcoin’s value was built into Nakamoto’s original “white paper”. This claimed that Bitcoin would be superior to existing forms of electronic money such as credit cards, providing benefits like eliminating chargebacks to merchants and reducing transaction fees.
The libertarians
https://preview.redd.it/hj1wccewwdk11.jpg?width=960&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=13fb0db227ad6cf5f497d5e28e19d55934fa4b70
FMZ
But from an early stage, Nakamoto also marketed Bitcoin to a libertarian audience. He did so by stressing the absence of any central authority and particularly Bitcoin’s independence from both states and existing financial institutions.
Nakamoto criticised central banks for debasing money by issuing increasing amounts of it and designed Bitcoin to have a hard limit on the amount that could be issued. And he stressed the anonymity of Bitcoin transactions: safe, more or less, from the prying eyes of the state. Libertarians became enthusiastic advocates and buyers of Bitcoin, more as an act of rebellion than for financial reasons. They have remained highly influential in the Bitcoin community.
The savvy young
These, however, were small constituencies, and Bitcoin really started to take off in July 2010 when a short article on Slashdot: News for nerds, stuff that matters(“news for nerds”) spread the word to many young and technically savvy buyers. This community was influenced by the “Californian ideology” – belief in the capacity of technology and entrepreneurs to transform the world.
Many bought small quantities at a low price and were somewhat bemused to find themselves sitting on significant investments when the price multiplied. They became used to huge fluctuations in the price and frequently advocated “hodling” Bitcoin (a mis-spelling of “hold”, first used in a now iconic message posted by an inebriated user determined to resist constant “sell” messages from day traders). The hodlers insisted, half seriously, that Bitcoin was going “to the moon!” (used 178,000 times on the bitcointalk forums), and talked of buying “lambos” (lamborghinis) with their gains. This countercultural levity generated a sense of community and a commitment to holding Bitcoin that helps to sustain its value.
The investors
FMZ
The last two groups that have contributed to Bitcoin’s history are more conventional. What I consider the fourth group of investors consists of speculators who have been attracted by the volatility and peaks in Bitcoin prices.
On the one hand, we have the day traders, who hope to exploit the volatility of Bitcoin’s price by buying and selling quickly to take advantage of short-term price movements. Like speculators in any other asset, they have no real interest in the larger picture or of questions of inherent value, but only in the price today. Their only narratives are “buy” and “sell”, often employed in an attempt to influence the market.
On the other hand, we have those who are drawn in by news of price bubbles. Ironically, bubble narratives in the press, often designed to deter investors, can have the opposite effect. These investors join what Keynes called a “beauty contest” – they only care what other people might be prepared to pay for a Bitcoin in the short to medium term future.
www.fmz.com
The portfolio balancers
The final and newest group of Bitcoin buyers are the portfolio balancers: more sophisticated investors who buy Bitcoin to hedge against wider risks in the financial system. According to modern portfolio theory, investors can reduce the riskiness of their portfolios overall by buying some Bitcoin because its peaks and troughs don’t line up with those of other assets, providing some insurance against stock market crashes. This is an emerging group, but one that could significantly raise Bitcoin’s acceptability among mainstream investors.
Bitcoin’s value, then, has been built on an evolving series of narratives which have drawn in successive waves of buyers. While mainstream commentators are often dismissive of Bitcoin as lacking inherent value, all asset market values depend on narrative processes like these.
Bitcoin may well collapse again, but so may any other financial asset. Investing in Bitcoin is neither more nor less risky than investing in the latest technology company launched on the stock market without ever having made a profit.
FMZ
submitted by FmzQuant to u/FmzQuant [link] [comments]

Anti-Bitcoin people trying to use five dollar wrench argument

I've just seen this argument used many times now on Slashdot: "Bitcoin has failed because US government already has ability to control it, see Ross Ulbricht"
I'd like to say, I don't think there is any technology for anything anywhere that prevents a five dollar wrench attack. Once the government has it out for you and uses their near infinite resources, there really is few things you can do. I believe Ross was an example of this. But I don't think anyone trading in any other currency or medium has any way to totally always remain anonymous and out of reach from government hands. Bitcoin is the only thing that even comes close to this.
If the only way my store of value is hacked is with a five dollar wrench attack, I'd say that's pretty damned good currency.
submitted by luffintlimme to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to export inflation to the financial sector: ice tea company gets into blockchains

Ice Tea Company Rebrands as 'Long Blockchain' and Stock Price Triples (arstechnica.com)
Long Island Ice Tea is going to continue to sell ice tea but also invest in blockchain applications for fintech. They can satisfy their money demand with purely virtual goods such as bitcoin, and not have to raise prices on their physical product. Same with land investors; houses can be replaced as an investment, with virtual goods that do not require land. Land can depreciate and become unenclosed again as rich ppl don't need to hoard it as an investment, because they can get much higher returns from purely virtual goods that do not depend on land in any way ...
What would that mean for a land value tax? Would you have to add a bitcoin tax? Where does your frenzy to tax and punish end?
submitted by smegko to BasicIncome [link] [comments]

Help a Rip Van Winkle out

I need some ELI25 on segwit2x, the conspiracy it represents, and exactly why bitpay's announcement has created such angst.
I've tried Google and I've tried here, but Google offers up old news and posters here are so closely following events that they are posting comments and links fraught with detailed knowledge of wtf is going on that someone like me, who has awakened from a years long slumber, can't make any sense of it.
I first heard about Bitcoin in the slashdot post in the summer of 2011. I immediately understood the beauty and started solo mining using my video card and doing lots of research. Within days that led me to switch to a mining pool.
I understood the algorithms better than most. I could explain what a merkle tree was in detail and follow the esoteric discussions about theoretical attacks.
I opened a MtGox account and wisely pulled my Bitcoin well before the end when I realized I couldn't pull any cash.
I bought an SLR camera with Bitcoin from Roger Ver and an ASIC miner that was delivered so late as to be useless. I even declared them on my taxes.
I stopped running a node. I moved my wallet files offline. I watched the price moves with some interest, but despite having a kraken account, I wasn't tempted to sell. I figured Bitcoin made sense and waiting would be the right move.
I'd occasionally read /bitcoin. I felt comfortable in my decisions and my understanding of the situation.
At current exchange levels, my Bitcoin is valued more than my savings. And, I have a few months of expenses in savings, so that puts me ahead of most. My Bitcoin is valued less than my 401k, which has a value typical or slightly less so for someone my age.
That comfort I've felt with my decision to continue sitting on my Bitcoin hasn't changed. However, that comfort I've felt that I understood what was being discussed in /Bitcoin is gone.
Can someone explain it or point me to a resource that does without the need for tons of prior assumptions? I'd love a detailed technical discussion instead of some simpler analogy, but I'll take either.
submitted by ljapa to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Mass Surveillance News Collection from 2010

>>>>>>>>> Mass Surveillance
>>>>>>>>> Cognitive Infiltration and Mass Social Psychology Abuse
>>>>>>>> Smartphone Intrusion, Remote activation of Mics and Cameras
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Ways and Means; Technology and Law
>>>>>>> AT&T
>>>>>>>>>> Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Yahoo
>>>>>>>> Goals
>>>>>>>>>>> Lies, Coverups, Resource Misuse, and Danger of Tacit Complicity
>>>>>> Global Deep State Cooperation and Imitation
>>>>>>>>> Hardware, Rootkit, FIrmware Spyware
>>>>>>>> Blowback
>>>>>> Exoteric, Stated Goals of the Security State Have Failed
....CONTINUED IN COMMENTS
submitted by 911bodysnatchers322 to conspiracy [link] [comments]

Second.

Reddit (stylized as reddit, /ˈrɛdɪt/)[5] is an American social news aggregation, web content rating, and discussion website. Reddit's registered community members can submit content, such as text posts or direct links. Registered users can then vote submissions up or down to organize the posts and determine their position on the site's pages. The submissions with the most positive votes appear on the front page or the top of a category. Content entries are organized by areas of interest called "subreddits". The subreddit topics include news, science, gaming, movies, music, books, fitness, food, and image-sharing, among many others. The site's terms of use prohibit behaviors such as harassment, and moderating and limiting harassment has taken substantial resources.[6]
As of 2017, Reddit had 542 million monthly visitors (234 million unique users), ranking #7 most visited web-site in US and #22 in the world.[7] Across 2015, Reddit saw 82.54 billion pageviews, 73.15 million submissions, 725.85 million comments, and 6.89 billion upvotes from its users.[8]
Reddit was founded by University of Virginia roommates Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian in 2005. Condé Nast Publications acquired the site in October 2006. Reddit became a direct subsidiary of Condé Nast's parent company, Advance Publications, in September 2011. As of August 2012, Reddit operates as an independent entity, although Advance is still its largest shareholder.[9] Reddit is based in San Francisco, California. In October 2014, Reddit raised $50 million in a funding round led by Sam Altman and including investors Marc Andreessen, Peter Thiel, Ron Conway, Snoop Dogg, and Jared Leto.[10] Their investment saw the company valued at $500 million.[11][12]
Contents
1 Description 1.1 Site 1.2 Users 1.3 Subreddits 1.3.1 IAmA and AMA 1.3.2 /science 1.3.3 April Fools subreddits 1.3.3.1 The Button 1.3.3.2 Robin 2 History 3 Technology 4 Demographics 5 Community and culture 5.1 Philanthropic efforts 5.2 Commercial activity 5.3 Reddit effect 5.4 "Restoring Truthiness" campaign 5.5 Controversies 5.5.1 2010 5.5.2 2011 5.5.3 2013 5.5.4 2014 5.5.5 2015 5.5.6 2016 5.5.7 2017 6 Other 7 See also 8 References 9 External links 
Description Site
The site is a collection of entries submitted by its registered users, essentially a bulletin board system. The name "Reddit" is a play-on-words with the phrase "read it", i.e., "I read it on Reddit."[13] The site's content is divided into numerous categories, and 49 such categories, or "default subreddits", are visible on the front page to new users and those who browse the site without logging in to an account. As of May 2016, these include:[14] Category Subreddits Educational News, Science, Space, DataIsBeautiful, TodayILearned, WorldNews Entertainment Creepy, Documentaries, Gaming, ListenToThis, Movies, Music, NoSleep, Sports, Television, Videos Discussion-based AskReddit, AskScience, Books, ExplainLikeImFive, History, IAmA, TwoXChromosomes Humolight-hearted Funny, InternetIsBeautiful, Jokes, NotTheOnion, ShowerThoughts, TIFU, UpliftingNews Image sharing Art, Aww, EarthPorn, Gifs, MildlyInteresting, OldSchoolCool, PhotoshopBattles, Pics Self-improvement DIY, Food, GetMotivated, LifeProTips, PersonalFinance, Philosophy, WritingPrompts Technology Futurology, Gadgets Meta Announcements, Blog
Note: There are over 11,400 active subreddits[15][16][17] with a default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. 
When items (links or text posts) are submitted to a subreddit, the users, called "redditors",[18] can vote for or against them (upvote/downvote). Each subreddit has a front page that shows newer submissions that have been rated highly. Redditors can also post comments about the submission, and respond back and forth in a conversation-tree of comments; the comments themselves can also be upvoted and downvoted. The front page of the site itself shows a combination of the highest-rated posts out of all the subreddits a user is subscribed to.
Front-page rank – for both the general front page and for individual subreddits – is determined by the age of the submission, positive ("upvoted") to negative ("downvoted") feedback ratio and the total vote-count.[19] Dozens of submissions cycle through these front pages daily.
The site's logo and its mascot is a line drawing of an alien nicknamed "Snoo". Subreddits often use themed variants of Snoo relevant to the subject.[20]
Although most of the site functions like a bulletin board or message board, each subreddit has the option of having an associated wiki that can provide supplementary material like instructions, recommended reading, or collaboration for real-life events. Users
Registering an account with Reddit is free and does not require an email address to complete. As of June 2015, there were 36 million user accounts.[21] When logged in, Reddit users (known as redditors) have the ability to vote on submissions and comments to increase or decrease their visibility and submit links and comments. Users can also create their own subreddit on a topic of their choosing, and interested users can add it to their frontpage by subscribing to it. For example, as of May 2015, the Wikipedia subreddit – subtitled "the most interesting pages on Wikipedia" – has over 151,000 subscribers.[22] Reddit comments and submissions are occasionally abbreviated and peppered with terms that are understood within (and in many cases also outside) the Reddit community, ranging from OP (for "original poster" – the user who posted the submission being commented upon) to NSFW (for "not safe for work" – indicating the post has graphic or sexually explicit content).[23] Users earn "post karma" and "comment karma" for submitting text posts, link posts, and comments, which accumulate as point values on their user profile. "Post karma" refers to karma points received from text and link posts, while "comment karma" refers to karma points received from comments. Users may also be gifted "Reddit gold" if another user has well received the comment or post, generally due to humorous or high-quality content; this process is known as "gilding." Reddit has also created a system of points called "creddits". Reddit gold "creddits" are like gift certificates: each creddit you have allows you to give one month of Reddit gold to someone else. The points do not lead to a prize as they are meant to stand in as a badge of honor for the user among their peers, although redditors have attempted to redeem their points before.[24]
Reddit also allows submissions that do not link externally. These are called "self posts" or "text submissions". Many discussion-based subreddits allow only text-only submissions such as "AskReddit" – where users are only allowed to pose broad, discussion based questions to the community at large. Self posts previously did not accumulate karma points for the submitter, but as of July, 2016, these text-only posts generate karma.[25] Mister Splashy Pants logo used on November 27, 2007
Reddit communities occasionally coordinate Reddit-external projects such as skewing polls on other websites, such as in 2007 when Greenpeace allowed web users to decide the name of a humpback whale it was tracking. Reddit users voted en masse to name the whale "Mr. Splashy Pants", and Reddit administrators further encouraged this by changing the site logo to a whale during the voting. In December of that year, Mister Splashy Pants was announced as the winner of the competition.[26]
Within the site, redditors commemorate their "cake day" once a year, which is the anniversary of the day the user's account was first created. The "cake day" offers no special benefit, except that a small icon representing a slice of cake appears next to that user's name for 24 hours.[27] Redditors can "friend" one another, which gives a redditor quick access to posting and comments of their friend list. The commenting system and friend system, along with a certain "Reddit ethos" (called reddiquette on Reddit), lend Reddit aspects of a social networking service, though not to the extent of Facebook, Google+, and other websites aimed at providing social networking services. The Reddit community also socializes at meetups held at local parks and bars around the world,[28] and many localized subreddits for local in-person meetings exist. Subreddits
Reddit entries are organized into areas of interest called "subreddits". Originally, the front page was the "main-reddit", and other areas were "subreddits". There is now no longer a single main-reddit. Instead, there are now 50 "default subreddits" dealing with topics such as books, television, and music, and thousands of additional non-default subreddits. The default subreddits are the 50 subreddits which are first recommended to new users to select from to appear on, or via their customizable top menu bars. All new users are initially automatically "subscribed to" the 50 default subreddits, but can then customize their "subscriptions."
Any registered user who has maintained an account for 31 days or more may create a non-default subreddit.[29] There are over 11,400 active total subreddits to peruse,[15][16][17] including the default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. The site has a default "Front Page" which contains staff selected popular articles, and also an "All Page" which contains only the very top ranked article/ subreddits as ranked by readers themselves, and which page is accessible via an "All" link at the top of the "Front Page."
In an interview with Memeburn, Reddit GM, Martin noted that the platform's "approach is to give the community moderators or curators as much control as possible so that they can shape and cultivate the type of communities they want".[30] IAmA and AMA
One of the most popular subreddits is IAmA ("I Am A") where a user may post "AMAs" (for "Ask Me Anything"), or similarly "AMAAs" (for "Ask Me Almost/Absolutely Anything") – prompts for others to ask questions about any topic. AMAs are open to all Reddit users, and use the site's comment system for both questions and answers; it is similar to a press conference but online. This subreddit was founded in May 2009.[31] From 2013 to 2015, Victoria Taylor assisted reddit's volunteer community in presenting interviews.[32][33][34]
A number of notable individuals have participated in the IAmA subreddit, including United States President Barack Obama[35][36] (while campaigning for the 2012 election), Dave Grohl,[37] Madonna,[38] Chris Hadfield[39] (who answered questions from the International Space Station), Bill Gates,[40] Ron Paul,[41] Stephen Colbert,[42] Psy, Enya, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Rachel Maddow, Robin Williams,[43] Renée Fleming, M. Shadows, Louis C.K., Roger Federer, Larry King, Philip Zimbardo, Bill Nye,[44] Stan Lee, John Mather, David Copperfield, Michael Moore, Spike Lee, Paul Krugman, Danny Boyle, rapper J. Cole,[45] Al Gore, Roger Ebert, Michael Bolton, Gary Johnson, Lawrence Krauss, Jill Stein, Kevin Rudd, Julie Benz,[46] Amanda Palmer,[47] Tim Ferriss,[48] Gordon Ramsay,[49] Peter Dinklage,[50] Chandra Wickramasinghe,[51] Neil deGrasse Tyson,[52] and Bernie Sanders.[53] Donald Trump (during his 2016 Presidential Campaign) had an AMA on /The Donald subreddit.[54] As of April 2015, Barack Obama's AMA is the highest rated on the site;[55] the increased traffic brought down many parts of the website when the AMA occurred on August 29, 2012.[56]
Celebrities participating in IAmAs have seen both positive and negative responses. Woody Harrelson's[57] AMA was criticized after Harrelson declined to answer questions that were unrelated to the movie Rampart he was promoting.[58] In contrast, rapper Snoop Dogg attracted 1.6 million page views[59] after conducting an AMA that provided several candid responses to the community's questions.[60]
Other than Harrelson's, Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra's[61] AMA was criticized for evasiveness when she focused on promoting her upcoming album to the detriment of other questions. A particularly well received AMA of 2014 was that of Peter Dinklage,[62] best known for his role as Tyrion Lannister in the HBO drama series Game of Thrones. Redditors attribute the thread's success to the thoroughness of his responses and the fact that he stayed online much longer than he was expected to so he could spend more time with his fans. The actor departed by commenting:
This feels like being interviewed by a hundred thousand news anchors at once! But much friendlier anchors...who seem to know their material...I really appreciate everyone's enthusiasm and questions. I tried to move another engagement to make more time but it's really hard during shoots. I am going to try to answer a few more short ones now. And remember: If you see me on the street and want a photo, ask! It's just weird when your kid asks for directions.[63] 
On July 2, 2015, hundreds of subreddits, including several with over a million subscribers, were set to private by their respective moderators after Reddit's director of talent, Victoria Taylor, was dismissed.[64][65][66][67] Sources close to Reddit cited an increased focus on commercializing AMAs as the most likely reason.[68][69] /science File:American Chemical Society - What Chemists Do - Nathan Allen.webmPlay media Nathan Allen speaks about /science to the American Chemical Society Main article: /science
/science is an Internet forum on Reddit where the community of participants discuss science topics.[70] A popular feature of the forum is "Ask me Anything" (AMA) public discussions.[70] As of 2014, /science attracted 30,000–100,000 visitors per day, making it the largest community-managed science forum and an attractive place to host discussions.[70] April Fools subreddits The Button Main article: The Button (Reddit)
On April Fools' Day 2015, a social experiment was launched in the form of a subreddit called "thebutton". It featured a button and a 60-second countdown timer. User accounts created before that day were eligible to participate. A user could only ever click the button once, or opt not to click it. If a user clicked the button the timer was globally reset to 60 seconds,[71] and the user's "flair" (an icon next to the user's name) changed color. Colors were assigned based on a gradient from purple to red with purple signifying up to 60 seconds and red as low as 0 seconds. The countdown prematurely reached zero several times due to technical problems but eventually expired without further problems on June 5, 2015, after which the subreddit was archived.[72] Robin
On April Fools' Day 2016, a social experiment was launched in the form of a chat widget named Robin. After clicking the "Robin" button, an IRC-like chat window was initially opened with one other redditor and giving a certain time to pick between three options, "Grow," "Stay" and "Abandon".[73] "Grow" would join the chat with another group, "Stay" would close the group chat and create a subreddit with that group as moderators and "Abandon" would close the group chat and everyone goes back to a group of two. History Further information: Timeline of Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian speaking in 2009
In June 2005,[74] Reddit was founded in Medford, Massachusetts by Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian, both 22-year-old graduates of the University of Virginia.[75] The team expanded to include Christopher Slowe in November 2005. Between November 2005 and January 2006 Reddit merged with Aaron Swartz's company Infogami, and Swartz became an equal owner of the resulting parent company, Not A Bug.[76][77] Condé Nast Publications, owner of Wired, acquired Reddit on October 31, 2006, and the team moved to San Francisco.[78] In January 2007, Swartz was fired.[79]
By the end of 2008, the team had grown to include Erik Martin, Jeremy Edberg,[80] David King,[81] and Mike Schiraldi.[82] In 2009, Huffman and Ohanian moved on to form Hipmunk, recruiting Slowe[83] and King[84] shortly thereafter. In May 2010, Reddit was named in Lead411's "2010 Hottest San Francisco Companies" list.[85] In July 2010, after explosive traffic growth, Reddit introduced Reddit Gold, offering new features for a price of $3.99/month or $29.99/year.[86] Reddit Gold adds a number of features to the interface, including the ability to display more comments on a page, access to the private "lounge" subreddit, and notifications whenever one's username is mentioned in a comment. It's also possible to endow comments or submissions of other users and thereby give a gold membership to them as an anonymous present.[87]
On September 6, 2011, Reddit became operationally independent of Condé Nast, now operating as a separate subsidiary of its parent company, Advance Publications.[88] On January 11, 2012, Reddit announced that it would be participating in a 12-hour sitewide blackout in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act.[89] The blackout occurred on January 18 and coincided with the blackouts of Wikipedia and several other websites. In May 2012, Reddit joined the Internet Defense League, a group formed to organize future protests.[90] On February 14, 2013, Reddit began accepting the digital currency bitcoin for its Reddit Gold subscription service through a partnership with bitcoin payment processor Coinbase.[91]
In October 2014, Reddit announced Redditmade, a service which allowed moderators to create merchandise for their subreddits. Redditmade closed in February 2015.[92] In November 2014, Chief Executive Yishan Wong resigned and co-founder Ohanian returned as the full-time executive chairman. Ellen Pao, Reddit's business and partnerships strategist became the interim chief executive.[93] On July 10, 2015, Pao resigned and was replaced by Steve Huffman as CEO.[94][95]
In October 2015, Reddit announced a news portal called Upvoted, designed to broaden the reach of Reddit as a standalone site featuring editorial content from Reddit users.[96] In April 2016, Reddit launched a new blocking tool in an attempt to curb online harassment. The tool allows a user to hide posts and comments from selected redditors in addition to blocking private messages from those redditors.[97] The option to block a redditor is done by clicking a button in the inbox. Technology
Reddit was originally written in Common Lisp but was rewritten in Python in December 2005.[4] The reasons given for the switch were wider access to code libraries and greater development flexibility. The Python web framework that former Reddit employee Swartz developed to run the site, web.py, is now available as an open-source project.[98] On June 18, 2008, Reddit became an open source project.[99] With the exception of the anti-spam/cheating portions, all of the code and libraries written for Reddit became freely available on GitHub.[100] As of November 10, 2009, Reddit uses Pylons as its web framework.[101]
As of November 10, 2009, Reddit has decommissioned their physical servers and migrated to Amazon Web Services.[102] Reddit uses PostgreSQL as their primary datastore and is slowly moving to Apache Cassandra, a column-oriented datastore. It uses RabbitMQ for offline processing, HAProxy for load balancing and memcached for caching. In early 2009, Reddit started using jQuery.[103] On June 7, 2010, Reddit staff launched a revamped mobile interface featuring rewritten CSS, a new color scheme, and a multitude of improvements.[104]
On July 21, 2010, Reddit outsourced the Reddit search engine to Flaptor, who used its search product IndexTank.[105] As of July 12, 2012, Reddit uses Amazon CloudSearch.[106] There are several unofficial applications that use the Reddit API in the Google Play store, and F-Droid repository. Examples include: Reddit is Fun,[107] Andreddit,[108] F5, BaconReader,[109] Reddit Sync[110] and an Android tablet specific application called Reddita.[111] There are also several Windows apps used to access Reddit, including unofficial Reddit apps such as ReddHub[112] and Reddit To Go!.[113] An unofficial desktop application Reditr[114] exists that is compatible with Windows, OS X, Linux and ChromeOS.
There are several Reddit applications for iOS. These include Karma, Upvote, iReddit, iPad-specific applications such as Reddzine and Biscuit, and, until April 2016, Alien Blue.[115] In September 2014, an official mobile application for browsing AMA (Ask Me Anything) threads was released for the iOS and Android platforms under the name Ask me Anything.[116] In October 2014, Alien Blue was acquired by Reddit and became the official iOS Reddit app.[117] In April 2016, Reddit released an official application called Reddit: The Official App, which is available on Google Play and the iOS App Store, and Alien Blue was removed from the App Store in favor of the new app.[118] Demographics
According to Reddit's Audience and Demographics page, as of December 2015, 53% of redditors are male and 54% are from the United States.[119] In 2013, Pewinternet stated that 6% of all American adult Internet users have used Reddit; that males were twice as likely to be redditors as females were; and that Reddit's largest age bracket was between the ages of 18 and 29.[120] As of the end of 2016, Reddit is the only major social media platform that does not have a female majority user base.[121] Community and culture
The website is known for its open nature and diverse user community that generate its content.[122] Its demographics allows for wide-ranging subject areas, or main subreddits, that receive much attention, as well as the ability for smaller subreddits to serve more niche purposes. For example, the University of Reddit, a subreddit that exists to communally teach, emerged from the ability to enter and leave the online forum, the "classroom", at will, and classes ranging from computer science to music, to fine art theory exist.[123] The unique possibilities that subreddits provide create new opportunities for raising attention and fostering discussion across many areas. In gaining popularity in terms of unique users per day, Reddit has been a platform for many to raise publicity for a number of causes. And with that increased ability to garner attention and a large audience, users can use one of the largest communities on the Internet for new, revolutionary, and influential purposes.[124]
Its popularity has enabled users to take unprecedented advantage of such a large community. Its innovative socially ranked rating and sorting system drives a method that is useful for fulfilling certain goals of viewership or simply finding answers to interesting questions. User sentiments about the website's function and structure include feelings about the breadth and depth of the discussions on Reddit and how the site makes it easy to discover new and interesting items. Almost all of the user reviews on Alexa.com, which rates Reddit's monthly unique traffic rating 125th in the United States, mention Reddit's "good content" as a likable quality. However, others raise the negative aspects of the potential for Reddit's communities to possess a "hive mind" of sorts,[125] embodying some negative aspects of group interaction theories like crowd psychology and collective consciousness. Philanthropic efforts
Reddit has been known as the instigator of several charity projects, some short and others long-term, in order to benefit others. A selection of major events are outlined below:
In early October 2010, a story was posted on Reddit about a seven-year-old girl, Kathleen Edward, who was in the advanced stages of Huntington's disease. The girl's neighbors were taunting her and her family. Redditors banded together and gave the girl a shopping spree[126][127] at Tree Town Toys, a toy store local to the story owned by a Reddit user. In early December 2010, members of the Christianity subreddit decided to hold a fundraiser[128] and later members of the atheism subreddit decided to give some friendly competition,[129] cross-promoting[130] fundraising drives for Doctors Without Borders and World Vision's Clean Water Fund, respectively. Later, the Islam subreddit joined in, raising money for Islamic Relief. In less than a week, the three communities (as well as the Reddit community at large) raised over $50,000.[131] Most of this was raised by the atheism subreddit, though the smaller Christianity subreddit had a higher average donation amount per subscriber.[132] A similar donation drive in 2011 saw the atheism subreddit raise over $200,000 for charity.[133] Reddit started the largest Secret Santa program in the world, which is still in operation to date. For the 2010 Holiday season, 92 countries were involved in the Secret Santa program. There were 17,543 participants, and $662,907.60 was collectively spent on gift purchases and shipping costs.[134][135][136] In 2014, about 200,000 users from 188 countries participated.[137] Several celebrities have participated in the program, including Bill Gates[138] and Snoop Dogg.[139] Eventually, the Secret Santa program expanded to various other occasions through Redditgifts. Members from Reddit donated over $600,000 to DonorsChoose in support of Stephen Colbert's March to Keep Fear Alive. The donation spree broke previous records for the most money donated to a single cause by the Reddit community and resulted in an interview with Colbert on Reddit.[140] Reddit users donated $185,356 to Direct Relief for Haiti after an earthquake devastated the nation in January 2010.[141] Reddit users donated over $70,000 to the Faraja Orphanage in the first 24 hours to help secure the orphanage after intruders robbed and attacked one of the volunteers, who survived a strike to the head from a machete.[142] In October 2012, "Shitty Watercolour", a popular Redditor known for posting watercolor paintings on the website,[143][144][145] streamed live a 12-hour painting session on YouTube to raise money for charity: water, a non-profit organization which aims to provide potable drinking water in developing countries. Redditors donated a minimum of $10 to have a photo of their choice painted in a 5 by 5 centimetres (2.0 by 2.0 in) square section of large sheets of paper.[146][147] The paint-a-thon raised $2,700.[148] In February 2014, Reddit announced it would be donating 10% of its annual ad revenue to non-profits voted upon by its users.[149] Reddit continued this policy for 2015, donating $82,765 each to Electronic Frontier Foundation, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Doctors Without Borders, Erowid Center, Wikimedia Foundation, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, NPR, Free Software Foundation, Freedom From Religion Foundation, and Tor Project.[150] In response to the 2015 Nepal earthquake, redditors raised more than $145,000 for Direct Relief and more than $110,000 for MAP International.[151] 
Commercial activity
In February 2013, Betabeat published a post that recognized the influx of multi-national corporations like Costco, Taco Bell, Subaru, and McDonald's posting branded content on Reddit that was made to appear as if it was original content from legitimate Reddit users.[152] Reddit's former Director of Communications noted that while a large number of Chief Marketing Officers want to "infiltrate the reddit community on behalf of their brand," she emphasized that "self-promotion is frowned upon" and the site is "100 percent organic."[153][154][155][156] She recommended that advertisers design promotions that "spark conversations and feedback."[157] She recommended that businesses use AMAs to get attention for public figures but cautioned "It is important to approach AMAs carefully and be aware that this may not be a fit for every project or client."[158] Nissan ran a successful Branded content promotion offering users free gifts to publicize a new car,[159][160] though the company was later ridiculed for suspected astroturfing when the CEO only answered puff piece questions on the site.[161][162] Taylor described these situations as "high risk" noting "We try hard to educate people that they have to treat questions that may seem irreverent or out of left field the same as they would questions about the specific project they are promoting."[163]
Reddit's users are more privacy-conscious than on other websites, using tools like AdBlock and proxies,[164] and they hate "feeling manipulated by brands" but respond well to "content that begs for intelligent viewers and participants."[165] Lauren Orsini writes in ReadWrite that "Reddit's huge community is the perfect hype machine for promoting a new movie, a product release, or a lagging political campaign" but "very specific set of etiquette. Redditors don't want to advertise for you, they want to talk to you."[166] Journalists have used the site as a basis for stories, though they are advised by the site's policies to respect that "reddit's communities belong to their members" and to seek proper attribution for people's contributions.[167]
Reddit announced that they would begin using VigLink to redirect affiliate links in June 2016.[168] Reddit effect Main article: Slashdot effect
Also known as the "Slashdot effect", the Reddit effect occurs when a smaller website has a high influx of traffic after being linked to on Reddit.[169] It is also called the "Reddit Hug of Death" among the website's users. Because Reddit is such a large site, the traffic is immense and can easily crash smaller sites. In order for users to see crashed websites, several Reddit bots have been created that take a snapshot of the website before large amounts of traffic flood the affected website. "Restoring Truthiness" campaign
As a response to Glenn Beck's August 28, 2010, Restoring Honor rally (heavily promoted by him in his Fox News broadcasts during the summer), in September 2010 Reddit users started a movement to persuade satirist Stephen Colbert to have a counter-rally in Washington, D.C.[170] The movement, which came to be called "Restoring Truthiness", was started by user mrsammercer, in a post where he described waking up from a dream in which Stephen Colbert was holding a satirical rally in D.C.[171] He writes, "This would be the high water mark of American satire. Half a million people pretending to suspend all rational thought in unison. Perfect harmony. It'll feel like San Francisco in the late 60s, only we won't be able to get any acid."
The idea resonated with the Reddit community, which launched a campaign to bring the event to life. Over $600,000[172] was raised for charity to gain the attention of Colbert. The campaign was mentioned on-air several times, and when the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear was held in Washington, D.C. on October 30, 2010, thousands of redditors made the journey.[173]
During a post-rally press conference, Reddit co-founder Ohanian asked, "What role did the Internet campaign play in convincing you to hold this rally?" Jon Stewart responded by saying that, though it was a very nice gesture, the two had already thought of the idea prior and the deposit on using the National Mall was already paid during the summer, so it acted mostly as a "validation of what we were thinking about attempting".[174] In a message to the Reddit community, Colbert later added, "I have no doubt that your efforts to organize and the joy you clearly brought to your part of the story contributed greatly to the turnout and success."[175] Controversies See also: Controversial Reddit communities and Michael Brutsch
The website generally lets moderators on individual subreddits make editorial decisions about what content to allow, and has a history of permitting some subreddits dedicated to controversial content.[176] Many of the default pages are highly moderated, with the "science" subreddit banning climate change denialism,[177] and the "news" subreddit banning opinion pieces and columns.[178] Reddit has changed its site-wide editorial policies several times, sometimes in reaction to controversies.[179][180][181][182] Reddit has had a history of giving a platform to objectionable but legal content, and in 2011, news media covered the way that jailbait was being shared on the site before the site changed their policies to explicitly ban "suggestive or sexual content featuring minors".[183] Following some controversial incidents of Internet vigilantism, Reddit introduced a strict rule against the publication of non-public personally-identifying information via the site (colloquially known as doxxing). Those who break the rule are subject to a site-wide ban, and their posts and even entire communities may be removed for breaking the rule. 2010
On December 16, 2010, a redditor named Matt posted a link describing how he has donated a kidney, and included a JustGive link to encourage users to give donations to the American Cancer Society.[184] After an initially positive reaction, Reddit users began to become suspicious of Matt's intentions, and suggested that he was keeping the donations for himself. Users telephoned his home and he received death threats. Matt eventually proved that he was genuine by uploading his doctor's records.[185] 2011
On October 18, 2011, an IT manager submitted a post to the subreddit "gameswap" offering Redditors to trade one of 312 codes he had been given for the game Deus Ex: Human Revolution.[186] A group of users obtained his personal details, and began to blackmail him for the codes.[187] The Monday after uploading the post, he received 138 threatening phone calls both at home and at his job, and by the end of the day he had been fired.[188] 2013
Following the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, Reddit faced criticism after users wrongly identified a number of people as suspects.[189] Notable among misidentified bombing suspects was Sunil Tripathi, a student reported missing before the bombings took place. A body reported to be Sunil's was found in Providence River in Rhode Island on April 25, 2013, according to Rhode Island Health Department. The cause of death was not immediately known, but authorities said they did not suspect foul play.[190] The family later confirmed Tripathi's death was a result of suicide.[191] Reddit general manager Martin later issued an apology for this behavior, criticizing the "online witch hunts and dangerous speculation" that took place on the website.[192] The incident was later referenced in the season 5 episode of the CBS TV series The Good Wife titled "Whack-a-Mole,"[193] as well as The Newsroom.[194][195]
In late October 2013, the moderators of the "politics" subreddit banned a large group of websites. Many were left wing opinion websites, such as Mother Jones, The Huffington Post, Salon, Alternet, Rawstory, The Daily Kos, Truthout, Media Matters, and ThinkProgress as well as some popular progressive blog sites, such as Democratic Underground and Crooks and Liars. They also banned a number of right wing sites—Drudge Report, Breitbart, The Daily Caller, Dailypaul, Power Line, and Reason. Salon reported that "the section's moderators explained in a post on Tuesday, the goal is 'to reduce the number of blogspam submissions and sensationalist titles.' The purge, the moderators explained, is also aimed at sites that provide lots of "bad journalism."[196] The December 2013 list of banned websites has been modified since late October, and sites with original content, such as Mother Jones and The Huffington Post, are allowed.[197] Moderators also banned RT, which moderators stated was due to vote manipulation and spam, though one moderator stated that he wanted RT banned because it is Kremlin backed.[198][199] 2014
In August 2014, photos from the 2014 celebrity photo hack were widely disseminated across the site.[200][201] A dedicated subreddit, "TheFappening," was created for this purpose,[202] and contained links to most if not all of the criminally obtained explicit images.[203][204][205][206][207] Some images of Liz Lee and McKayla Maroney from the leak were identified by redditors and outside commentators as child pornography because the photos were taken when the women were underage.[208] The subreddit was banned on September 6.[209] The scandal led to wider criticisms concerning the website's administration from The Verge and The Daily Dot.[210][211]
Also in August 2014, moderators and administrators censored a sizeable amount of content related to the GamerGate controversy; one thread in the "gaming" subreddit had almost 24,000 comments removed.[212] Multiple subreddits were deleted by administrators for voicing opinions on Zoe Quinn, Anita Sarkeesian, Brianna Wu and similarly important GamerGate controversy figures.[213] The subreddit "ZoeQuinnDiscussion" was banned for violating the Reddit rules.[214] Administrators defended this response when questioned, blaming 4chan for raiding threads and causing harm. This was debated by some redditors.[215] An anonymous subreddit moderator claims he was removed for leaking correspondence between himself and Zoe Quinn.[216] On December 18, 2014, Reddit took the unusual step of banning a subreddit, "SonyGOP," that was being used to distribute hacked Sony files.[217] 2015
After Ellen Pao became CEO, she was initially a target of criticism by users who objected to her lawsuit.[218] Later on June 10, 2015, Reddit shut down the 150,000-subscriber "fatpeoplehate" subreddit and four others citing issues related to harassment.[219] This move was seen as very controversial; some commenters said that the bans went too far, while others said that the bans did not go far enough.[220] One of the latter complaints concerned a subreddit that was "expressing support" for the perpetrator of the Charleston church shooting.[221] Responding to the accusations of "skewed enforcement", Reddit reaffirmed their commitment to free expression and stated that "There are some subreddits with very little viewership that get highlighted repeatedly for their content, but those are a tiny fraction of the content on the site."
On July 2, 2015, Reddit began experiencing a series of blackouts as moderators set popular subreddit communities to private, in an event dubbed "AMAgeddon," a portmanteau of AMA ("ask me anything") and Armageddon. This was done in protest of the recent firing of Victoria Taylor, an administrator who helped organize citizen-led interviews with famous people on the popular "Ask me Anything" subreddit. Organizers of the blackout also expressed resentment about the recent severance of the communication between Reddit and the moderators of subreddits.[222] The blackout intensified on July 3 when former community manager David Croach gave an AMA about being fired. Before deleting his posts, he stated that Ellen Pao dismissed him with one year of health coverage when he had cancer and did not recover quickly enough.[223][224] Following this, a Change.org petition to remove Pao as CEO of Reddit Inc. reached over 200,000 signatures.[225][226][227] Pao posted a response on July 3 as well as an extended version of it on July 6 in which she apologized for bad communication and not delivering on promises. She also apologized on behalf of the other administrators and noted that problems already existed over the past several years.[228][229][230][231] On July 10, Pao resigned as CEO and was replaced by former CEO and co-founder Steve Huffman.[94][232]
submitted by ViabilityTest to test [link] [comments]

Having your say, while ensuring the healthy future of Bitcoin Core and its team..

(Ironically censored by the gutless limp-wrists of /bitcoin)
I’ve noticed a very odd attribute regarding Bitcoin over the past few years - one that seems to speak in heavy tones, much more than the decentralization concept itself and late last year it hit the fan.
Generally when an innovator builds a product, they may choose select people from the public, bring in their own experts, advertising for people fitting a specific area of society or world-renowned leaders in a given field; to both give impressions, ideas on improvements or possible gotchas before product release. It must be reiterated that these people were approached for their opinion. These people act in a civil manner, when in doubt – they generally discuss an issue until they have a workaround or a solution and most important of all, they sign the necessary documents and limit their communications regarding what they have seen both with the innovator (or company) and others; especially if it is a financial endeavour. They are liable for their actions after the fact.
Obviously the Bitcoin community is made up of a large amount of people who come from either a computing background, a financial/entrepreneurial background or even just those curious about the technology. These people care about the future of Bitcoin – and anyone who does is obviously willing to sacrifice some of their own time into improving the technology by learning how to debug/code, having their own test setup or finding some way to make sure the Core team feels valued for their hard work (as well as essentially having to lose their personal privacy once they become well known).
Not exclusively relevant to Bitcoin (how you treat people, developing a working relationship):
You do not loudly and obnoxiously shout your opinion; especially if you have a limited understanding of the subject matter and its implementation. If you don’t understand how an engine is built, or at least an in-depth understanding of how it works, you wouldn’t open your mouth at the unveiling of a prestigious new motoring technology. This is what an idiot would do. If you feel that strongly about something, go and develop the necessary skills to contribute, come back once you’ve actually got something to bring to the table and discuss.
At the least, think about some materialistic way to help them forward, whether it be currency or hardware. Life is NOT a zero-sum game – you get out what you invest. The Core developers do not work for you. Opinions are like arseholes, everyone has one and most of them smell rotten. If you have some sort of issue or disagreement, go code up a solution, submit it via standard means and if it gets accepted, pat yourself on the back for contributing.
If you don’t have any of these attributes, nor care strongly enough to get involved – then go sit in the corner quietly, or do something else.
We’ve seen countless people come and go in the past few years. Mike Hearn recently had enough harassment, sold up and left to what will be a very lucrative career. Regardless of his own ideas/opinion towards Bitcoin, or how he left (do you honestly blame him for the harassment he copped, working on an open-source project for free with what seems like a thousand separate bosses – each with their own vested interests) to work for a company that will look after him for life – he is successful because he put the time in and tried. He did not just stand by the sidelines and yell.
Feel free to donate to the developers, if you have the means and you want a say. Slashdot has been running some excellent deals (Slashdot ‘Top Deals’ at the bottom of their page) on programming, networking and mathematics content. Most are ‘pay what you want’ with a minimum of $1. Absolutely no excuses. For those who are able to employ people in the relevant fields – form a company or group and pursue it this way.
Otherwise – use what has been developed for you for free and be grateful – not dickheads.
submitted by barrystyle to btc [link] [comments]

Having your say, while ensuring the healthy future of Bitcoin Core and its team..

I’ve noticed a very odd attribute regarding Bitcoin over the past few years - one that seems to speak in heavy tones, much more than the decentralization concept itself and late last year it hit the fan.
Generally when an innovator builds a product, they may choose select people from the public, bring in their own experts, advertising for people fitting a specific area of society or world-renowned leaders in a given field; to both give impressions, ideas on improvements or possible gotchas before product release.
It must be reiterated that these people were approached for their opinion. These people act in a civil manner, when in doubt – they generally discuss an issue until they have a workaround or a solution and most important of all, they sign the necessary documents and limit their communications regarding what they have seen both with the innovator (or company) and others; especially if it is a financial endeavour. They are liable for their actions after the fact.
Obviously the Bitcoin community is made up of a large amount of people who come from either a computing background, a financial/entrepreneurial background or even just those curious about the technology. These people care about the future of Bitcoin – and anyone who does is obviously willing to sacrifice some of their own time into improving the technology by learning how to debug/code, having their own test setup or finding some way to make sure the Core team feels valued for their hard work (as well as essentially having to lose their personal privacy once they become well known).
Not exclusively relevant to Bitcoin (how you treat people, developing a working relationship):
You do not loudly and obnoxiously shout your opinion; especially if you have a limited understanding of the subject matter and its implementation. If you don’t understand how an engine is built, or at least an in-depth understanding of how it works, you wouldn’t open your mouth at the unveiling of a prestigious new motoring technology. This is what an idiot would do. If you feel that strongly about something, go and develop the necessary skills to contribute, come back once you’ve actually got something to bring to the table and discuss.
At the least, think about some materialistic way to help them forward, whether it be currency or hardware. Life is NOT a zero-sum game – you get out what you invest.
The Core developers do not work for you. Opinions are like arseholes, everyone has one and most of them smell rotten. If you have some sort of issue or disagreement, go code up a solution, submit it via standard means and if it gets accepted, pat yourself on the back for contributing.
If you don’t have any of these attributes, nor care strongly enough to get involved – then go sit in the corner quietly, or do something else.
We’ve seen countless people come and go in the past few years. Mike Hearn recently had enough harassment, sold up and left to what will be a very lucrative career. Regardless of his own ideas/opinion towards Bitcoin, or how he left (do you honestly blame him for the harassment he copped, working on an open-source project for free with what seems like a thousand separate bosses – each with their own vested interests) to work for a company that will look after him for life – he is successful because he put the time in and tried. He did not just stand by the sidelines and yell.
Feel free to donate to the developers, if you have the means and you want a say.
Slashdot has been running some excellent deals (Slashdot ‘Top Deals’ at the bottom of their page) on programming, networking and mathematics content. Most are ‘pay what you want’ with a minimum of $1. Absolutely no excuses.
For those who are able to employ people in the relevant fields – form a company or group and pursue it this way.
Otherwise – use what has been developed for you for free and be grateful – not dickheads.
submitted by barrystyle to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Reddit (stylized as reddit, /ˈrɛdɪt/)[5] is a social news aggregation, web content rating, and discussion website. Reddit's registered community members can submit content, such as text posts or direct links.

Registered users can then vote submissions up or down to organize the posts and determine their position on the site's pages. The submissions with the most positive votes appear on the front page or the top of a category. Content entries are organized by areas of interest called "subreddits". The subreddit topics include news, science, gaming, movies, music, books, fitness, food, and image-sharing, among many others. The site's terms of use prohibit behaviors such as harassment, and moderating and limiting harassment has taken substantial resources.[6]
As of 2016, Reddit had 542 million monthly visitors (234 million unique users), ranking #11 most visited web-site in US and #25 in the world.[7] Across 2015, Reddit saw 82.54 billion pageviews, 73.15 million submissions, 725.85 million comments, and 6.89 billion upvotes from its users.[8]
Reddit was founded by University of Virginia roommates Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian in 2005. Condé Nast Publications acquired the site in October 2006. Reddit became a direct subsidiary of Condé Nast's parent company, Advance Publications, in September 2011. As of August 2012, Reddit operates as an independent entity, although Advance is still its largest shareholder.[9] Reddit is based in San Francisco, California. In October 2014, Reddit raised $50 million in a funding round led by Sam Altman and including investors Marc Andreessen, Peter Thiel, Ron Conway, Snoop Dogg, and Jared Leto.[10] Their investment saw the company valued at $500 million.[11][12]
Contents
1 Description 1.1 Site 1.2 Users 1.3 Subreddits 1.3.1 IAmA and AMA 1.3.2 /science 1.3.3 April Fools subreddits 1.3.3.1 The Button 1.3.3.2 Robin 2 History 3 Technology 4 Demographics 5 Community and culture 5.1 Philanthropic efforts 5.2 Commercial activity 5.3 Reddit effect 5.4 "Restoring Truthiness" campaign 5.5 Controversies 5.5.1 2010 5.5.2 2011 5.5.3 2013 5.5.4 2014 5.5.5 2015 5.5.6 2016 6 Other 7 See also 8 References 9 External links 
Description Site
The site is a collection of entries submitted by its registered users, essentially a bulletin board system. The name "Reddit" is a play-on-words with the phrase "read it", i.e., "I read it on Reddit."[13] The site's content is divided into numerous categories, and 49 such categories, or "default subreddits", are visible on the front page to new users and those who browse the site without logging in to an account. As of May 2016, these include:[14] Category Subreddits Educational News, Science, Space, DataIsBeautiful, TodayILearned, WorldNews Entertainment Creepy, Documentaries, Gaming, ListenToThis, Movies, Music, NoSleep, Sports, Television, Videos Discussion-based AskReddit, AskScience, Books, ExplainLikeImFive, History, IAmA, TwoXChromosomes Humolight-hearted Funny, InternetIsBeautiful, Jokes, NotTheOnion, ShowerThoughts, TIFU, UpliftingNews Image sharing Art, Aww, EarthPorn, Gifs, MildlyInteresting, OldSchoolCool, PhotoshopBattles, Pics Self-improvement DIY, Food, GetMotivated, LifeProTips, PersonalFinance, Philosophy, WritingPrompts Technology Futurology, Gadgets Meta Announcements, Blog
Note: There are over 11,400 active subreddits[15][16][17] with a default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. 
When items (links or text posts) are submitted to a subreddit, the users, called "redditors",[18] can vote for or against them (upvote/downvote). Each subreddit has a front page that shows newer submissions that have been rated highly. Redditors can also post comments about the submission, and respond back and forth in a conversation-tree of comments; the comments themselves can also be upvoted and downvoted. The front page of the site itself shows a combination of the highest-rated posts out of all the subreddits a user is subscribed to.
Front-page rank – for both the general front page and for individual subreddits – is determined by the age of the submission, positive ("upvoted") to negative ("downvoted") feedback ratio and the total vote-count.[19] Dozens of submissions cycle through these front pages daily.
The site's logo and mascot is a line drawing of an alien nicknamed "Snoo". Subreddits often use themed variants of Snoo relevant to the subject.[20]
Although most of the site functions like a bulletin board or message board, each subreddit has the option of having an associated wiki that can provide supplementary material like instructions, recommended reading, or collaboration for real-life events. Users
Registering an account with Reddit is free and does not require an email address to complete. As of June 2015, there were 36 million user accounts.[21] When logged in, Reddit users (known as redditors) have the ability to vote on submissions and comments to increase or decrease their visibility and submit links and comments. Users can also create their own subreddit on a topic of their choosing, and interested users can add it to their frontpage by subscribing to it. For example, as of May 2015, the Wikipedia subreddit – subtitled "the most interesting pages on Wikipedia" – has over 151,000 subscribers.[22] Reddit comments and submissions are occasionally abbreviated and peppered with terms that are understood within (and in many cases also outside) the Reddit community, ranging from OP (for "original poster" – the user who posted the submission being commented upon) to NSFW (for "not safe for work" – indicating the post has graphic or sexually explicit content).[23] Users earn "post karma" and "comment karma" for submitting text posts, link posts, and comments, which accumulate as point values on their user profile. "Post karma" refers to karma points received from text and link posts, while "comment karma" refers to karma points received from comments. Users may also be gifted "Reddit gold" if another user has well received the comment or post, generally due to humorous or high quality content; this process is known as "gilding." Reddit has also created a system of points called "creddits". Reddit gold "creddits" are like gift certificates: each creddit you have allows you to give one month of Reddit gold to someone else. The points do not lead to a prize as they are meant to stand in as a badge of honor for the user among their peers, although redditors have attempted to redeem their points before.[24]
Reddit also allows submissions that do not link externally. These are called "self posts" or "text submissions". Many discussion-based subreddits allow only text-only submissions such as "AskReddit" – where users are only allowed to pose broad, discussion based questions to the community at large. Self posts previously did not accumulate karma points for the submitter, but as of July, 2016, these text only posts generate karma.[25] Mister Splashy Pants logo used on November 27, 2007
Reddit communities occasionally coordinate Reddit-external projects such as skewing polls on other websites, such as in 2007 when Greenpeace allowed web users to decide the name of a humpback whale it was tracking. Reddit users voted en masse to name the whale "Mr. Splashy Pants", and Reddit administrators further encouraged this by changing the site logo to a whale during the voting. In December of that year, Mister Splashy Pants was announced as the winner of the competition.[26]
Within the site, redditors commemorate their "cake day" once a year, which is the anniversary of the day the user's account was first created. The "cake day" offers no special benefit, except that a small icon representing a slice of cake appears next to that user's name for 24 hours.[27] Redditors can "friend" one another, which gives a redditor quick access to posting and comments of their friend list. The commenting system and friend system, along with a certain "Reddit ethos" (called reddiquette on Reddit), lend Reddit aspects of a social networking service, though not to the extent of Facebook, Google+, and other websites aimed at providing social networking services. The Reddit community also socializes at meetups held at local parks and bars around the world,[28] and many localized subreddits for local in-person meetings exist. Subreddits
Reddit entries are organized into areas of interest called "subreddits". Originally, the front page was the "main-reddit", and other areas were "subreddits". There is now no longer a single main-reddit. Instead, there are now 50 "default subreddits" dealing with topics such as books, television, and music, and thousands of additional non-default subreddits. The default subreddits are the 50 subreddits which are first recommended to new users to select from to appear on, or via their customizable top menu bars. All new users are initially automatically "subscribed to" the 50 default subreddits, but can then customize their "subscriptions."
Any registered user who has maintained an account for 31 days or more may create a non-default subreddit.[29] There are over 11,400 active total subreddits to peruse,[15][16][17] including the default set of 50 subreddits as of February 2016. The site has a default "Front Page" which contains staff selected popular articles, and also an "All Page" which contains only the very top ranked article/ subreddits as ranked by readers themselves, and which page is accessible via an "All" link at the top of the "Front Page."
In an interview with Memeburn, Reddit GM, Martin noted that the platform's "approach is to give the community moderators or curators as much control as possible so that they can shape and cultivate the type of communities they want".[30] IAmA and AMA
One of the most popular subreddits is IAmA ("I Am A") where a user may post "AMAs" (for "Ask Me Anything"), or similarly "AMAAs" (for "Ask Me Almost/Absolutely Anything") – prompts for others to ask questions about any topic. AMAs are open to all Reddit users, and use the site's comment system for both questions and answers; it is similar to a press conference but online. This subreddit was founded in May 2009.[31] From 2013 to 2015, Victoria Taylor assisted reddit's volunteer community in presenting interviews.[32][33][34]
A number of notable individuals have participated in the IAmA subreddit, including United States President Barack Obama[35][36] (while campaigning for the 2012 election), Dave Grohl,[37] Madonna,[38] Chris Hadfield[39] (who answered questions from the International Space Station), Bill Gates,[40] Ron Paul,[41] Stephen Colbert,[42] Psy, Enya, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Rachel Maddow, Renée Fleming, M. Shadows, Louis C.K., Roger Federer, Larry King, Philip Zimbardo, Bill Nye,[43] Stan Lee, John Mather, David Copperfield, Paul Krugman, Danny Boyle, rapper J. Cole,[44] Al Gore, Roger Ebert, Michael Bolton, Gary Johnson, Lawrence Krauss, Jill Stein, Kevin Rudd, Julie Benz,[45] Amanda Palmer,[46] Tim Ferriss,[47] Gordon Ramsay,[48] Peter Dinklage,[49] Chandra Wickramasinghe,[50] Neil deGrasse Tyson,[51] and Bernie Sanders.[52] Donald Trump (during his 2016 Presidential Campaign) had an AMA on /The Donald subreddit.[53] As of April 2015, Barack Obama's AMA is the highest rated on the site;[54] the increased traffic brought down many parts of the website when the AMA occurred on August 29, 2012.[55]
Celebrities participating in IAmAs have seen both positive and negative responses. Woody Harrelson's[56] AMA was criticized after Harrelson declined to answer questions that were unrelated to the movie Rampart he was promoting.[57] In contrast, rapper Snoop Dogg attracted 1.6 million page views[58] after conducting an AMA that provided several candid responses to the community's questions.[59]
Other than Harrelson's, Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra's[60] AMA was criticized for evasiveness when she focused on promoting her upcoming album to the detriment of other questions. A particularly well received AMA of 2014 was that of Peter Dinklage,[61] best known for his role as Tyrion Lannister in the HBO drama series Game of Thrones. Redditors attribute the thread's success to the thoroughness of his responses and the fact that he stayed online much longer than he was expected to so he could spend more time with his fans. The actor departed by commenting:
This feels like being interviewed by a hundred thousand news anchors at once! But much friendlier anchors...who seem to know their material...I really appreciate everyone's enthusiasm and questions. I tried to move another engagement to make more time but it's really hard during shoots. I am going to try to answer a few more short ones now. And remember: If you see me on the street and want a photo, ask! It's just weird when your kid asks for directions.[62] 
On July 2, 2015, hundreds of subreddits, including several with over a million subscribers, were set to private by their respective moderators after Reddit's director of talent, Victoria Taylor, was dismissed.[63][64][65][66] Sources close to Reddit cited an increased focus on commercializing AMAs as the most likely reason.[67][68] /science File:American Chemical Society - What Chemists Do - Nathan Allen.webmPlay media Nathan Allen speaks about /science to the American Chemical Society Main article: /science
/science is an Internet forum on Reddit where the community of participants discuss science topics.[69] A popular feature of the forum is "Ask me Anything" (AMA) public discussions.[69] As of 2014, /science attracted 30,000-100,000 visitors per day, making it the largest community-managed science forum and an attractive place to host discussions.[69] April Fools subreddits The Button Main article: The Button (Reddit)
On April Fools' Day 2015, a social experiment was launched in the form of a subreddit called "thebutton". It featured a button and a 60-second countdown timer. User accounts created before that day were eligible to participate. A user could only ever click the button once, or opt not to click it. If a user clicked the button the timer was globally reset to 60 seconds,[70] and the user's "flair" (an icon next to the user's name) changed color. Colors were assigned based on a gradient from purple to red with purple signifying up to 60 seconds and red as low as 0 seconds. The countdown prematurely reached zero several times due to technical problems but eventually expired without further problems on June 5, 2015, after which the subreddit was archived.[71] Robin
On April Fools' Day 2016, a social experiment was launched in the form of a chat widget named Robin. After clicking the "Robin" button, an IRC-like chat window was initially opened with one other redditor and giving a certain time to pick between three options, "Grow," "Stay" and "Abandon".[72] "Grow" would join the chat with another group, "Stay" would close the group chat and create a subreddit with that group as moderators and "Abandon" would close the group chat and everyone goes back to a group of two. History Further information: Timeline of Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian speaking in 2009
In June 2005,[73] Reddit was founded in Medford, Massachusetts by Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian, both 22-year-old graduates of the University of Virginia.[74] The team expanded to include Christopher Slowe in November 2005. Between November 2005 and January 2006 Reddit merged with Aaron Swartz's company Infogami, and Swartz became an equal owner of the resulting parent company, Not A Bug.[75][76] Condé Nast Publications, owner of Wired, acquired Reddit on October 31, 2006, and the team moved to San Francisco.[77] In January 2007, Swartz was fired.[78]
By the end of 2008, the team had grown to include Erik Martin, Jeremy Edberg,[79] David King,[80] and Mike Schiraldi.[81] In 2009, Huffman and Ohanian moved on to form Hipmunk, recruiting Slowe[82] and King[83] shortly thereafter. In May 2010, Reddit was named in Lead411's "2010 Hottest San Francisco Companies" list.[84] In July 2010, after explosive traffic growth, Reddit introduced Reddit Gold, offering new features for a price of $3.99/month or $29.99/year.[85] Reddit Gold adds a number of features to the interface, including the ability to display more comments on a page, access to the private "lounge" subreddit, and notifications whenever one's username is mentioned in a comment. It's also possible to endow comments or submissions of other users and thereby give a gold membership to them as an anonymous present.[86]
On September 6, 2011, Reddit became operationally independent of Condé Nast, now operating as a separate subsidiary of its parent company, Advance Publications.[87] On January 11, 2012, Reddit announced that it would be participating in a 12-hour sitewide blackout in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act.[88] The blackout occurred on January 18 and coincided with the blackouts of Wikipedia and several other websites. In May 2012, Reddit joined the Internet Defense League, a group formed to organize future protests.[89] On February 14, 2013, Reddit began accepting the digital currency bitcoin for its Reddit Gold subscription service through a partnership with bitcoin payment processor Coinbase.[90]
In October 2014, Reddit announced Redditmade, a service which allowed moderators to create merchandise for their subreddits. Redditmade closed in February 2015.[91] In November 2014, Chief Executive Yishan Wong resigned and co-founder Ohanian returned as the full-time executive chairman. Ellen Pao, Reddit's business and partnerships strategist became the interim chief executive.[92] On July 10, 2015, Pao resigned and was replaced by Steve Huffman as CEO.[93][94]
In October 2015, Reddit announced a news portal called Upvoted, designed to broaden the reach of Reddit as a standalone site featuring editorial content from Reddit users.[95] In April 2016, Reddit launched a new blocking tool in an attempt to curb online harassment. The tool allows a user to hide posts and comments from selected redditors in addition to blocking private messages from those redditors.[96] The option to block a redditor is done by clicking a button in the inbox. Technology
Reddit was originally written in Common Lisp but was rewritten in Python in December 2005.[4] The reasons given for the switch were wider access to code libraries and greater development flexibility. The Python web framework that former Reddit employee Swartz developed to run the site, web.py, is now available as an open-source project.[97] On June 18, 2008, Reddit became an open source project.[98] With the exception of the anti-spam/cheating portions, all of the code and libraries written for Reddit became freely available on GitHub.[99] As of November 10, 2009, Reddit uses Pylons as its web framework.[100]
As of November 10, 2009, Reddit has decommissioned their physical servers and migrated to Amazon Web Services.[101] Reddit uses PostgreSQL as their primary datastore and is slowly moving to Apache Cassandra, a column-oriented datastore. It uses RabbitMQ for offline processing, HAProxy for load balancing and memcached for caching. In early 2009, Reddit started using jQuery.[102] On June 7, 2010, Reddit staff launched a revamped mobile interface featuring rewritten CSS, a new color scheme, and a multitude of improvements.[103]
On July 21, 2010, Reddit outsourced the Reddit search engine to Flaptor, who used its search product IndexTank.[104] As of July 12, 2012, Reddit uses Amazon CloudSearch.[105] There are several unofficial applications that use the Reddit API in the Google Play store, and F-Droid repository. Examples include: Reddit is Fun,[106] Andreddit,[107] F5, BaconReader,[108] Reddit Sync[109] and an Android tablet specific application called Reddita.[110] There are also several Windows apps used to access Reddit, including unofficial Reddit apps such as ReddHub[111] and Reddit To Go!.[112] An unofficial desktop application Reditr[113] exists that is compatible with Windows, OS X, Linux and ChromeOS.
There are several Reddit applications for iOS. These include Karma, Upvote, iReddit, iPad-specific applications such as Reddzine and Biscuit, and, until April 2016, Alien Blue.[114] In September 2014, an official mobile application for browsing AMA (Ask Me Anything) threads was released for the iOS and Android platforms under the name Ask me Anything.[115] In October 2014, Alien Blue was acquired by Reddit and became the official iOS Reddit app.[116] In April 2016, Reddit released an official application called Reddit: The Official App, which is available on Google Play and the iOS App Store, and Alien Blue was removed from the App Store in favor of the new app.[117] Demographics
According to Reddit's Audience and Demographics page, as of December 2015, 53% of redditors are male and 54% are from the United States.[118] In 2013 Pewinternet.org stated that 6% of all American adult Internet users have used Reddit; that males were twice as likely to be redditors as females were; and that Reddit's largest age bracket was between the ages of 18 and 29.[119] Community and culture
The website is known for its open nature and diverse user community that generate its content.[120] Its demographics allows for wide-ranging subject areas, or main subreddits, that receive much attention, as well as the ability for smaller subreddits to serve more niche purposes. For example, the University of Reddit, a subreddit that exists to communally teach, emerged from the ability to enter and leave the online forum, the "classroom", at will, and classes ranging from computer science to music, to fine art theory exist.[121] The unique possibilities that subreddits provide create new opportunities for raising attention and fostering discussion across many areas. In gaining popularity in terms of unique users per day, Reddit has been a platform for many to raise publicity for a number of causes. And with that increased ability to garner attention and a large audience, users can use one of the largest communities on the Internet for new, revolutionary, and influential purposes.[122]
Its popularity has enabled users to take unprecedented advantage of such a large community. Its innovative socially ranked rating and sorting system drives a method that is useful for fulfilling certain goals of viewership or simply finding answers to interesting questions. User sentiments about the website's function and structure include feelings about the breadth and depth of the discussions on Reddit and how the site makes it easy to discover new and interesting items. Almost all of the user reviews on Alexa.com, which rates Reddit's monthly unique traffic rating 125th in the United States, mention Reddit's "good content" as a likable quality. However, others raise the negative aspects of the potential for Reddit's communities to possess a "hive mind" of sorts,[123] embodying some negative aspects of group interaction theories like crowd psychology and collective consciousness. Philanthropic efforts
Reddit has been known as the instigator of several charity projects, some short and others long-term, in order to benefit others. A selection of major events are outlined below:
In early October 2010, a story was posted on Reddit about a seven-year-old girl, Kathleen Edward, who was in the advanced stages of Huntington's disease. The girl's neighbors were taunting her and her family. Redditors banded together and gave the girl a shopping spree[124][125] at Tree Town Toys, a toy store local to the story owned by a Reddit user. In early December 2010, members of the Christianity subreddit decided to hold a fundraiser[126] and later members of the atheism subreddit decided to give some friendly competition,[127] cross-promoting[128] fundraising drives for Doctors Without Borders and World Vision's Clean Water Fund, respectively. Later, the Islam subreddit joined in, raising money for Islamic Relief. In less than a week, the three communities (as well as the Reddit community at large) raised over $50,000.[129] Most of this was raised by the atheism subreddit, though the smaller Christianity subreddit had a higher average donation amount per subscriber.[130] A similar donation drive in 2011 saw the atheism subreddit raise over $200,000 for charity.[131] Reddit started the largest Secret Santa program in the world, which is still in operation to date. For the 2010 Holiday season, 92 countries were involved in the Secret Santa program. There were 17,543 participants, and $662,907.60 was collectively spent on gift purchases and shipping costs.[132][133][134] In 2014, about 200,000 users from 188 countries participated.[135] Several Celebrities have participated in the program, including Bill Gates[136] and Snoop Dogg.[137] Eventually, the Secret Santa program expanded to various other occasions through Redditgifts. Members from Reddit donated over $600,000 to DonorsChoose in support of Stephen Colbert's March to Keep Fear Alive. The donation spree broke previous records for the most money donated to a single cause by the Reddit community and resulted in an interview with Colbert on Reddit.[138] Reddit users donated $185,356 to Direct Relief for Haiti after an earthquake devastated the nation in January 2010.[139] Reddit users donated over $70,000 to the Faraja Orphanage in the first 24 hours to help secure the orphanage after intruders robbed and attacked one of the volunteers, who survived a strike to the head from a machete.[140] In October 2012, "Shitty Watercolour", a popular Redditor known for posting watercolor paintings on the website,[141][142][143] streamed live a 12-hour painting session on YouTube to raise money for charity: water, a non-profit organization which aims to provide potable drinking water in developing countries. Redditors donated a minimum of $10 to have a photo of their choice painted in a 5 by 5 centimetres (2.0 by 2.0 in) square section of large sheets of paper.[144][145] The paint-a-thon raised $2,700.[146] In February 2014, Reddit announced it would be donating 10% of its annual ad revenue to non-profits voted upon by its users.[147] Reddit continued this policy for 2015, donating $82,765 each to Electronic Frontier Foundation, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Doctors Without Borders, Erowid Center, Wikimedia Foundation, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, NPR, Free Software Foundation, Freedom From Religion Foundation, and Tor Project.[148] In response to the 2015 Nepal Earthquake, redditors raised more than $145,000 for Direct Relief and more than $110,000 for MAP International.[149] 
Commercial activity
In February 2013, Betabeat published a post that recognized the influx of multi-national corporations like Costco, Taco Bell, Subaru, and McDonald's posting branded content on Reddit that was made to appear as if it was original content from legitimate Reddit users.[150] Reddit's former Director of Communications noted that while a large number of Chief Marketing Officers want to "infiltrate the reddit community on behalf of their brand," she emphasized that "self-promotion is frowned upon" and the site is "100 percent organic."[151][152][153][154] She recommended that advertisers design promotions that "spark conversations and feedback."[155] She recommended that businesses use AMAs to get attention for public figures but cautioned "It is important to approach AMAs carefully and be aware that this may not be a fit for every project or client."[156] Nissan ran a successful Branded content promotion offering users free gifts to publicize a new car,[157][158] though the company was later ridiculed for suspected astroturfing when the CEO only answered puff piece questions on the site.[159][160] Taylor described these situations as "high risk" noting "We try hard to educate people that they have to treat questions that may seem irreverent or out of left field the same as they would questions about the specific project they are promoting."[161]
Reddit's users are more privacy-conscious than on other websites, using tools like AdBlock and proxies,[162] and they hate "feeling manipulated by brands" but respond well to "content that begs for intelligent viewers and participants."[163] Lauren Orsini writes in ReadWrite that "Reddit's huge community is the perfect hype machine for promoting a new movie, a product release, or a lagging political campaign" but "very specific set of etiquette. Redditors don't want to advertise for you, they want to talk to you."[164] Journalists have used the site as a basis for stories, though they are advised by the site's policies to respect that "reddit's communities belong to their members" and to seek proper attribution for people's contributions.[165]
Reddit announced that they would begin using VigLink to redirect affiliate links in June 2016.[166] Reddit effect Main article: Slashdot effect
Also known as the "Slashdot effect", the Reddit effect occurs when a smaller website has a high influx of traffic after being linked to on Reddit.[167] It is also called the "Reddit Hug of Death" among the website's users. Because Reddit is such a large site, the traffic is immense and can easily crash smaller sites. In order for users to see crashed websites, several Reddit bots have been created that take a snapshot of the website before large amounts of traffic flood the affected website. "Restoring Truthiness" campaign
As a response to Glenn Beck's August 28, 2010, Restoring Honor rally (heavily promoted by him in his Fox News broadcasts during the summer), in September 2010 Reddit users started a movement to persuade Stephen Colbert to have a counter-rally in Washington, D.C.[168] The movement, which came to be called "Restoring Truthiness", was started by user mrsammercer, in a post where he described waking up from a dream in which Stephen Colbert was holding a satirical rally in D.C.[169] He writes, "This would be the high water mark of American satire. Half a million people pretending to suspend all rational thought in unison. Perfect harmony. It'll feel like San Francisco in the late 60s, only we won't be able to get any acid."
The idea resonated with the Reddit community, which launched a campaign to bring the event to life. Over $600,000[170] was raised for charity to gain the attention of Colbert. The campaign was mentioned on-air several times, and when the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear was held in Washington, D.C. on October 30, 2010, thousands of redditors made the journey.[171]
During a post-rally press conference, Reddit co-founder Ohanian asked, "What role did the Internet campaign play in convincing you to hold this rally?" Jon Stewart responded by saying that, though it was a very nice gesture, the two had already thought of the idea prior and the deposit on using the National Mall was already paid during the summer, so it acted mostly as a "validation of what we were thinking about attempting".[172] In a message to the Reddit community, Colbert later added, "I have no doubt that your efforts to organize and the joy you clearly brought to your part of the story contributed greatly to the turnout and success."[173]
See also
General
Crowdsourcing Internet culture PTT Bulletin Board System Social bookmarking Unidan Web 2.0 iconInternet portal 
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Free Bitcoin Script 2019 GET 5 BTC 👍 earn bitcoin fast ... Bitcoin hack Blockchain hack Live proof +38$ for 2 minutes Bitcoin HACK 2020 BITCOIN GRATIS Bitcoin hack Bitcoin mining software - YouTube Bitcoin hack free software BTC - YouTube

The value of BitCoin is really based in what someone is willing to pay you in legal tender in exchange for it, otherwise it's worthless. That's the pyramid part - it depends on new folks coming in and willing to buy your existing stock with legal tender which can then be used for goods and services. Without people actively buying into it with real currency, it's utterly useless and has no value. Slashdot Items Tagged "bitcoin" Date / Time Story; Monday August 03, 2020 @11:03AM: A 17-Year-Old's Journey: Minecraft, SIM-Swapping Bitcoin Heists, Breaching Twitter: Wednesday March 27, 2019 @10:41PM: Online-Only Currency BitCoin Reaches Dollar Parity : Monday March 21, 2016 @08:49AM: Australia Promises To Remove Tax On Bitcoin, Support FinTech Innovation: Sunday March 20, 2016 @03:03PM ... An anonymous reader writes "The value of bitcoin has surged through the $400 barrier for the first time, as unprecedented growth sees the virtual currency's value quadruple in just three months. Meanwhile, on 18 November, a Senate subcommittee is scheduled to hold a hearing on virtual currencies like bitcoin and its lesser-known competitors litecoin and altcoin. souravzzz writes with an update on the state of Bitcoin. Quoting the Ars Technica article: "Bitcoin, the world's first peer-to-peer digital currency, fell below $3 on Monday. That represents a 90 percent fall since the currency hit its peak in early June." That's still three times its value in Apri... An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: The amount of energy required to "mine" one dollar's worth of bitcoin is more than twice that required to mine the same value of copper, gold or platinum, according to a new paper, suggesting that the virtual work that underpins bitcoin, ethereum and similar projects is more similar to real mining than anyone intended.

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Free Bitcoin Script 2019 GET 5 BTC 👍 earn bitcoin fast ...

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